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Features

  • My husband and I have broken one of our cardinal rules of money management; we’ve purchased a new car.

    It’s actually a used car with limited miles but it’s still pretty new to us. It’s at the stage of its life where it has logged enough miles to have proven its reliability, but not so many as to submerge into the “nickel and dime” age of unending repairs as parts and components decide it’s time to die.

  • The Rev. Douglas Salisbury delivered the benediction at Monday’s Memorial Day service. Salisbury provided a copy of the prayer to the Banner.

  • A number of years ago I wrote a story about a man who was as lost as a soul could be.

    When I met him, he was a pastor, although he didn’t look like a typical pastor, if there is such a thing.

    I remember his shaved head and “ROUGH” tattooed across the back of his neck. I also remember thinking he was one scary looking dude.

    His wasn’t a sanitized, heartwarming story, although it started out that way.

  • I’ve always harbored a fascination with hotel rooms.

    Upon check-in I spend a good bit of time searching the room. I start at the kitchenette. I poke around in a diminutive refrigerator that would fit perfectly in the treetop home of cookie baking elves. My son has one in his room so I don’t know why I’m so charmed by the tiny hotel kitchenette fridge.

  • My husband and I grew up in two different cultures. He is an assimilated Hispanic from up North. I’m a Southerner who recently became vegan. How’s that for diversity? This blend of traditions has made life interesting at our home.

    Food has provided many opportunities for learning, growing and absolute, unmitigated horror.

  • Sometimes you go to church and you hear the same stuff over and over.

    Sometimes it flies over your head or you’re thinking about what’s for lunch and the pastor sounds like the teacher in the Charlie Brown cartoons going, “Waah, waah, waah,” and you have no idea what he said.

    And sometimes you hear something that you’ve heard before but for some reason it’s like you’re hearing it for the first time. Or maybe it’s the thing that you needed to hear precisely at that moment.

  • It is that time of year when the calendar and all of nature begins to tell us it is summertime!

    Traditionally and recreationally, we are told that summer begins with the celebration of Memorial Day. We all enjoy the good times that summer brings. Time for various outdoor activities that otherwise would not be suitable. But it is also good for us to take time before the hustle of summer activities to do some “remembering.” In fact, it is always good to pause in the hectic pace of life and purposefully make time to reminisce about the days and years gone by.

  • My pastor tells the story about his son needing spine surgery when he was just a young boy.

    He talks about bringing his son to the hospital and the agony of letting go of his boy, handing him over to the surgeons.

    It was a terrible surgery, he says, and they were so relieved when it was over.

    However, shortly after they had come home from the hospital, the doctor called – they missed something and had to redo the surgery.

  • The Second Continental Congress in 1775, established a National Day of Prayer which we celebrate the first Thursday in May. Hundreds of thousands of people across the country, many different faiths and denominations, nationalities, ethnic groups and ages, participated in prayer for our country.

  • iLEAD Academy participated in the Technology Student Association state competition on April 23 in Louisville. Students in all grade levels at iLEAD (freshmen, sophomores and juniors) competed individually or in small groups in various STEM-related events ranging from animatronics to CAD engineering to STEM careers to fashion design and technology. The three-day event was held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel and culminated with the award ceremony on Wednesday morning.

  • I love animals. It doesn’t matter if they are furry, finny or feathery. I still love them. I hold fast to that sentiment but I have met an animal that has tested my patience. This animal is the goose. Geese are mean. It doesn’t matter if they’re barnyard geese, Canada geese or snow geese, geese are mean. I suspect even Mother Goose had her bad days.

  • BY HILDA PARRISH

    A misunderstanding of meeting time proved to be an interesting and entertaining event for me Thursday night.

  • “Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things. Whatever you have learned or received or heard from me, or seen in me—put it into practice. And the God of peace will be with you” Philippians 4:8-9 (NIV).

  • My latest crime against intellect occurred at the gas station. I have pumped more gas in my time as a driver than I care to remember. In the past I commuted far distances for work so I found it necessary to buy gas more than once a week. In short, I know how to pump gas; except on this particular day.

    My kids and I were just finishing a quick trip to pick up a few items. I noticed that as was custom, my car was nearly out of gas. I pulled into a nearby gas station and that’s where my humiliation began.

  • The Trimble County Historical Society’s Cemetery Commission has been busy in the first week of May.

    The City of Bedford donated a 30-foot by 30-foot plot for a Veterans Memorial Park at the Bedford Cemetery. Trimble County Historical Society Cemetery Commission members Chris Liter, David Masterson, Chase Masterson and Lewis Popp, along with magistrate Kenny Green, moved the cemetery’s flagpole to its new location Saturday in the Trimble County Veterans Memorial Park.

  • Slowly the weather is, and will be, getting warmer here in Kentucky. People are planting flowers and preparing their gardens.

    In Oregon, where I grew up, as the weather warms, the vineyards of northwest Oregon become beautifully green and luscious. The scenes are very similar to what the land of ancient Israel must have looked like in Jesus’ era. In Jesus’ day the wine industry was vital to Israel’s economy.

  • Easter has passed, but I’m still thinking about a part of the gospel story of Christ’s resurrection that I often miss.

    It happened on that Sunday.

    Early in the morning the women had gone to the tomb where they had placed Christ’s body on Friday after his crucifixion.

    The women found the tomb empty and an angel told them Jesus wasn’t there, that he had risen, just as he had said.

    That part of the story I’ve never forgotten.

  • BY THOMAS CIFRANIK | Special to the Banner

    This weekend the Trimble County High School Drama Club will be performing the classic heartfelt drama, “Pride and Prejudice” this weekend.

    The club’s adaptation has been brought to the stage based off of the 2005 screen edition. Performance times are 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and at 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Admission to the show is $3 for students and $5 for adults. Funds from admission go toward future endeavors and the productions of the Drama Club.

  • Fourth Grade All A

    Gavin Beisler, Anna Brierly, Briley Clifford, Kieyah Fleck, Zachary Rice, Morgan Stark and Dani Sullivan.

    Fourth Grade A/B

    Michael Chandler, Elliott Easter, Alix Ellis, Bailey Hertz, Jackson Hosler, Mika Jett, Case Keeton, Kilei Law, Halle Liter, Montana Moore, Raven Nutgrass, Tatum Sandusky, Taylor Sparrow, Avery Stockdale, Jocie Stucker, Shawn Walls, Maya Wigren and Jayden Wright.

    Fifth Grade All A

    Hannah Chilton, Addison Mosley, Collin Stark, Landon Tuttle and Jolie Wilcoxson.

    Fifth Grade A/B

  • Every April, the Kentucky Circuit Court Clerks’ Trust for Life along with the entire United States celebrates National Donate Life Month. This a time to focus national and local attention on every individual’s power to make life possible by registering his or her decision to be an organ and tissue donor and learning more about living donation.