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Features

  • Recently I was with some friends talking about church when one said, “At my church it’s almost a competition as to who is the most broken.”

    He was joking. Sort of.

    But he was also saying something very beautiful, that at his church the members freely talk about the broken places in their lives instead of covering them up.

    In some churches, the members don’t dare share their true, broken selves -- too risky.

  • Second grade was a memorable year.

  • Have you ever had everything seem like it’s going your way then out of nowhere you get blindsided by the worst news you can think of? Some of you are there right now. Some parts of your life are really good, but something is weighing it down. So where is God in those valleys?

  • BY CRYSTAL CAUDILLO | The Trimble Banner

    Presentations were in abundance from second and fourth grade students in addition to the junior/senior high Student Technology Leadership Program, the junior high student council and BETA Club at the Trimble County Board of Education’s March 5 regular meeting at Bedford Elementary.

    The local AARP Grandparent of the Year essay winner Raven Nutgrass read her essay to the board and audience members.

  • EKU announces fall 2018 graduates

    Eastern Kentucky University recognized 1,072 graduates at the conclusion of the fall 2018 semester.

    The graduates were honored at separate academic college commencement ceremonies Dec. 14 at Alumni Coliseum.

    Local EKU graduates include: Allison Glenn Fornash, of Carrollton, Bachelor of Science in psychology; Laura Elizabeth Rich, of Richmond, Bachelor of Fine Arts in art; Micah Hess, of Arlington, Ind., Bachelor of Science in recreation and park administration.

  • BY CHARLES LISTON | Special to the Banner

    Spring is coming soon, so I hear. It’s been a long winter, but recent sunshine and warmer air stirs the blood, and watching the daffodils growing again generates much anticipation for coming beautiful flowers and fruitful gardens. The search will soon be on for evidence of active pollinators (butterflies, bees, moths hummingbirds) again doing their annual work, free of charge, in assuring bountiful supplies of heathy human foods.

  • LEXINGTON – More than 250 Kentucky women in agriculture gathered in Lexington this past weekend for the Kentucky Farm Bureau (KFB) Women’s Leadership Conference at the Embassy Suites in Lexington.

    The Kentucky Farm Bureau (KFB) Women’s Leadership Conference provided Kentucky women involved in agriculture a chance to network, hear from KFB leadership about a number of topics, and participate in informative workshops. It was also an opportunity to celebrate KFB’s centennial and the history of women’s engagement in agriculture in our state.

  • LOUISVILLE – The Kentucky Farm Bureau Beef Expo recorded total sales of $896,402 in its 33rd running March 1-3 at the Kentucky Exposition Center.

    With one less breed and 30.25 fewer lots than last year, Beef Expo sales averaged $2,150 per lot for 417 lots.

  • March is a peculiar month, even by my standards. It’s unpredictable, temperamental and completely dishonest. No other month is associated with lions, lambs and madness. Not one of the other eleven warned Caesar to “beware the Ides (15th) of March.” Not one of the other eleven is that creepy.

  • In describing a child attempting to be a successful student after being a victim of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE), Dr. Kenneth Fox said, “it’s like trying to play chess in the middle of a hurricane.”

    A child’s brain undergoes an amazing period of development from birth to three—producing more than a million neural connections each second.

    The development of the brain is influenced by many factors, including a child’s relationships, experiences and environment.

  • Many companies are offering both Pre-tax 401k and After-tax 401k Roth contributions within the company retirement plan. One of the most frequently asked questions I get is which one is the best for me to invest? The answer depends on your personal situation but, let me help shed some light so you can hopefully make an informed decision for your investments.

  • The CDC and Kaiser Permanente discovered an exposure that dramatically increases the risk for seven out of 10 of the leading causes of death in the United States. In high doses, it affects brain development, the immune system, hormonal systems, and even the way our DNA is read and transcribed. Folks who are exposed in very high doses have triple the lifetime risk of heart disease and lung cancer and a 20-year difference in life expectancy. And yet, doctors today are not trained in routine screening or treatment.

  • Last Sunday, my husband and I visited a church in Orlando.

    For years they met at a local high school, and last year they built their own building, a “campus.” Even though the place is huge, you can’t miss the sanctuary. Above the main doors, it says in big letters: SANCTUARY.

    We’ve heard the pastor preach before and already had a sense that this church truly is a sanctuary.

    Not every church that has a sanctuary, a dedicated worship space where the congregation meets with God, is a sanctuary, a place of safety and refuge.

  • The winter monsoon we’ve endured has finally granted us a reprieve. We’re now able to walk on the surface of the ground rather than slogging through inches of goop.

    This opportunity afforded by dry weather gave us time to dig out the horse shelter. A staggering amount of mud, puddles of something which was formerly rainwater before it took residence with the horses; and the wonderful byproduct of grain and hay once it completed its trek through the horse’s digestive system; all of this topped by a soggy mat of straw.

  • In 2017, we had a fire near Hardy Creek Road in Bedford. Ryan and Courtney Callis, the property owners, did not have a fire department subscription. The total charged for services from Bedford Fire and Rescue was close to $10,000.

    When asked about the fire and whether or not they would’ve paid the subscription in hindsight, Courtney Callis said they would be a “good example.”

  • It seems I started a firestorm on Facebook last Sunday.

    I had visited a church that’s not my regular church but one I’ve visited many times and where I know a lot of people. It’s a warm, welcoming, caring church, and I consider the pastor a friend.

    That said, something happened.

    Shortly after I sat down in a seat, a couple stopped near where I was sitting and looked a bit flustered.

    After 40-plus years in church, I knew that look. It was the “Oh dear, she’s in our seat” look.

  • The month of February has been known for some time as the “month of love.” For a number of years it has also been known as “American Heart Month.” Of course, we all know the famed day of love is celebrated in this month. It is a wonderful time to remember that people everywhere need to learn to love and be kind to others. Regardless of one’s race, gender, ethnicity or politics, we are all human beings, made in the image of God and commanded to love one another as God loves us.

  • MADISON, Ind. – King’s Daughters’ Health has been awarded a three-year term of accreditation in mammography as the result of a recent review by the American College of Radiology (ACR).

  • Long-term care is often times an after-thought in someone’s financial plan. I argue that it needs to be a key component of the financial planning process from step one. But why? What’s so important about long term care?

  • “And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love” (1 Corinthians 13:13, NIV).

    I hate to admit it, but we live in a consumer driven, disposable world.

    Our lives are filled with advertisements wanting our business. Consumer giants like Amazon continue to experience growth as more and more people order online. Every day something is invented, something is improved and there is something made that we just can’t live without.