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Features

  • Most folks over the age of 60 are familiar with the term Required Minimum Distribution (RMD), however, many don’t understand all the rules associated with taking your RMD. Let’s examine RMDs in this month’s column and hopefully answer any questions you may have on the subject.

  • BY HILDA PARRISH

    Hello, I am a barn. I’m not a red barn or a green barn. I’m not even a blue barn. I’m just a plain old wooden barn.

    I have double doors on the front and double doors on the back. Mr. Farmer, my owner, calls me his Tobacco Barn. He has a Hay Barn and a Cow Barn, but they can tell you about themselves later.

  • My husband took me to Washington D.C. as an eighth anniversary trip. I packed everything I thought we could possibly need; everything except rain gear. We had one small umbrella but everything else was thoroughly absorbent; possibly ultra-absorbent.

    Washington D.C. has incredible traffic around the clock. The streets are never empty and the lights are always red. The only way to get around is by scooter, bike, foot or fervent wishes. We dropped the car in a parking garage; a garage that held our car hostage; and set out to hit the town.

  • All of us, at some point, will go through a tough time. The truth is we’re either heading into a trial, in a trial, or coming out of a trial. I don’t know what it might be for you, but I’d guess you are probably battling one fire or another. It could be a financial, health-related, relational or employment. We all face fires.

  • A week or so ago, I went to a celebration of life service at a church I’d never been to before.

    Behind the altar was a huge glass wall with a huge glass mosaic crucifix in the middle.

    While I waited for the service to start, I studied the crucifix, the intricate pieces of colored glass fit together to form Christ’s body.

    Unlike a jigsaw puzzle, these glass pieces didn’t fit together smoothly and perfectly. The edges appeared to be rough. Perhaps the artist had used broken bits and pieces? I couldn’t tell.

  • BY CHARLES LISTON | Special to the Banner

    Some 1,800 Trimble County residents belong to Kentucky Farm Bureau, an organization supporting agriculture, enjoy many benefits such as affordable auto, home, farm, business, life, and health insurance, and more.

  • Anyone who grew up in the Ohio River Valley is well-acquainted with erratic weather. We grumble about unseasonable cold, torrential rain and “the air you can wear” humidity. Fickle weather is as much a part of Kentucky as bluegrass and aristocratic thoroughbreds.

    No matter how inconvenient it may be, our weather is like an annoying relative. No matter how much of an irritant it may be, it holds a special place in our hearts because of its familiarity.

  • Nobody loves eating doughnuts more than my great-niece, Lily.

    At 3, she eats them face-first, right into the top of the pink frosting and sprinkles (her favorite kind).

    Lily says, “I like them because they’re yummy.”

    What else is there to say?

    My niece Jennifer, Lily’s mom, sometimes posts videos of Lily eating a doughnut on Instagram, and as I watch I can’t help but think that God gets as much, maybe more, pleasure watching her as I do, or as Lily does eating.

  • Childhood trauma, or Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE), causes adult onset of chronic disease. It was determined by a group of neurobiologists at Harvard University and Rockefeller University that the toxic stress of chronic and severe trauma damages a child’s developing brain. It essentially stunts the growth of some parts of the brain, and fries the circuits with overdoses of stress hormones in others.

  • Much like a gunslinger, I react quickly giving minimal thought to whatever triggered the reaction. Sometimes it works, most time it explodes in my face. My vision statement is to make quick decisions because waiting means forgetting and things forgotten are seldom remembered. Unfortunately, rapid-fire decision making fails to factor in possible consequences, hence the potential facial detonation.

  • A few years ago, I learned that somewhere in Citrus County Jesus was in a tree.

    Not literally, but a woman had called the newsroom to say she could see an image of Jesus in a tree that was in her yard.

    Lots of people think they see Jesus in stuff. Just Google “things that look like Jesus” and you’ll see photos of the face of Jesus in everything from pieces of toast and cloud formations to slabs of marble or rust stains on the surface of an iron.

    Some items are even for sale on eBay.

    People see Jesus everywhere.

  • The late J. Edgar Hoover, first director of the F.B.I. said, “The cure for crime is not the electric chair, but the high chair.” He obviously understood that the treatment a child receives from the beginning of their life, highly impacts their behavior patterns throughout their life.

  • Is there anything more terrifying than a button?

  • LEXINGTON – The board of directors for Kentucky Employers’ Mutual Insurance (KEMI), the Kentucky Department of Insurance, and Franklin Circuit Court approved a plan to return $4.77 million to the Kentucky School Boards Insurance Trust Workers’ Compensation Fund (KSBIT). The refund is a result of effective management by KEMI to control claims costs.

  • Items published in court news are public record.

    The Trimble Banner publishes all misdemeanors, felonies and small-claims judgments recorded in district court, as well as all civil suits recorded in circuit court. Juvenile court cases are not published.

    Crime reports are provided by local law enforcement agencies. Charges or citations reported to The Trimble Banner do not imply guilt.

    The following cases were heard the week of March 25 by the Honorable Judge Diana E. Wheeler.

    FELONY

  •  My niece, Jennifer, has three daughters, Leah, Emma and Lily.

    Last year I bought them a book, “Thoughts to Make Your Heart Sing,” by Sally Lloyd-Jones. It’s a children’s devotional book that simplifies Bible stories and concepts — I highly recommend it for all my adult friends.

    Theology sometimes makes grown up people a bit crazy because we tend to take the simple and straightforward and make it ridiculous and complicated.

  • Research shows that the adversity we experience as children can affect us into adulthood. Challenges children face in school, life – and ultimately with their health – are often the symptoms of Adverse Childhood Experiences and toxic stress.

    The good news is, the earlier we can identify that a child is experiencing ACEs and toxic stress, the sooner children and families can be connected to the services they need to prevent or heal the effects.

  • Dementia is the most common neurodegenerative condition affecting older people. In recent years, the scientific understanding of dementia has shifted from that of a late-life disease that cannot be prevented to that of a lifelong disease process, where factors such as diet and education impact risk from the earliest stages of life.