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Today's News

  • State continues to pioneer medical research

    Earlier this fall, the University of Kentucky officially opened a new research facility designed to do one thing: Find new ways to defeat the diseases that take far too many of our loved ones.

  • Surviving or celebrating?

    A BRIGHTER DAY | The Rev. Doug Salisbury

    During the season of celebrating Christmas, with its carols, parties, decorating, baking, gift giving and family time, it’s easy for us to forget that in our own circle of associates there is likely to be someone for whom the idea of Christmas joy is not part of the season this year.

  • Looking Back and Do You Remember? | Nov. 29, 2018

    Dec. 1, 1988

    (30 years ago)

    District Rotary Governor 671 A.G. Spizzirri met with the Bedford Rotarians at a holiday dinner at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Bill Ransdell.

    The Trimble Banner Democrat was offering a one-year subscription to each student who completed the literacy program.

    Nov. 28, 1968

    (50 years ago)

  • Senses to have sense

    “But solid food is for the mature—for those whose senses have been trained to distinguish between good and evil” (Hebrews 5:14).

    God created humans to have a three-element composition for use in life: heart, soul and mind (Matt 22:37). Men and women are the top of the created order in their spender and glory. All of creation was in the hand of the master artist God.

  • Church events | Nov. 29, 2018

    Milton UMC Christmas cantata

    Milton United Methodist Church will host a community cantata, “Let Earth Receive Her King!” at 7 p.m. Sunday at the church, 11100 U.S. 421 North in Milton. All are invited to attend. Participating churches are Milton Baptist, Mt. Carmel Methodist, Bedford United Methodist, Corn Creek Baptist and Milton United Methodist.

    Bedford Baptist Christmas concert

  • Thankful in the darkness

    Editor’s note: This is the 20th year of Nancy Kennedy’s annual Thanksgiving psalm. She is still thankful.

    Dear God,

    As you know, I’ve had a difficult time starting this year’s Thanksgiving psalm.

    In fact, it’s a week late.

    Life hasn’t been sunshine and roses and rainbow-colored unicorns this year, not for me and not for a lot of people. And yet, I have much to be thankful for.

  • Raiders fall to Grant County in season opener

    The hiatus was over as the Trimble County Raiders returned to the court for its season opener Monday night against the Grant County Braves. However, it wasn’t the home opener the Raiders hoped for as Grant County’s offense outpaced the team much of the night, with a 93-52 loss at the final buzzer.

    “I thought we were ready to play but apparently we weren’t and we kind of reverted back to some of our habits where if somebody smacks us in the face, instead of standing up and fighting, we fold,” said head coach Ron Couch.

  • Lady Raiders open season at Frankfort

    The 2018-19 high school basketball season has arrived for the Trimble County Lady Raiders who hope to sharply improve on last year’s rebuilding year that concluded with a 2-21 record. Coach Kerrie Stewart’s youthful team opened the new season on the road Monday with a 51-42 loss at Frankfort, a game which the girls “should have” won, Stewart said.

  • Gifts to help family, friends eat healthy

    Having a hard time finding gifts for friends and family and staying on budget? Making your own healthy gifts can be both an affordable and fun way to give friends and family gifts, while also encouraging them to eat healthy. Here are some great gift ideas for any occasion:

    Mason jar gifts:

  • Importance of cleaning, disinfecting horse stalls

    Cleaning and disinfecting stalls is critically important for biosecurity, especially in controlling disease outbreaks. However, much misinformation exists.

    The average 1,000-pound horse produces 50 pounds of manure and urine per day. Add on to that other body fluids that potentially contain pathogens (nasal discharges, abscess material, blood, etc.) and a significant organic load exists in the average horse stall. Any surface that needs to be disinfected (treated with chemicals in order to kill pathogens) must be cleaned of dirt and organic material first.