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Today's News

  • Raiders upended at Eminence

    By JAMES LINE

    Special to The Trimble Banner

    Eminence High School scored a victory over the Trimble County High School football team Friday, September 28, with a score 40-6. The first quarter began with repeated missed opportunities by the Raiders to take control of the ball.

  • State Police to hold traffic safety checkpoints

    The Kentucky State Police will be conducting traffic safety checkpoints in the counties of Oldham, Trimble, Henry, Owen, Carroll and Gallatin during the period of Oct. 8 - 22.

    The intent of a traffic safety checkpoint is to provide for high visibility public safety service, focusing on vehicular equipment deficiencies, confirming appropriate registration of vehicles and the licensing of drivers.
    Violations of law or other public safety issues that arise shall be addressed in accordance with Kentucky traffic and regulatory laws.
     

  • KSP asks Kentucky citizens to ‘Text a Tip’ to fight crime

    FRANKFORT, Ky. - The Kentucky State Police is initiating a new proactive program where citizens are now able to text confidential tips from their cell phone. The program, “Text a Tip,” is designed to report criminal activity, assist with neighborhood watch and serve as an additional resource for schools and college campuses.

  • Fall forest fire season underway around Kentucky

    FRANKFORT, Ky.  - The Kentucky Division of Forestry is once again preparing for an active wildfire season as lack of rain this summer and  increased fuel loads from spring storms could pose problems for fighting fires.

  • Horse Council unveils new license plate

    Lexington, KY - The Kentucky Horse Council has unveiled a new, updated design for the horse license plate known so well to Kentuckians. The new plate marries the old and new, by keeping the foal image that so many Kentuckians loved, but using new technology to enhance the image with more details and realism.

  • Kentucky Saves’ Piggy Bank Contest

    Saving money is important no matter your age, especially with an economy that is much like a roller coaster. Kentucky youth can learn the importance of saving money by participating in the Piggy Bank Design Contest. The contest is a way for the youth of Kentucky to display their creative skills to their county and potentially the state, while becoming more aware of how to build wealth and reduce debt. The Piggy Bank Design Contest is the youth component of Kentucky Saves. Kentucky Saves Week begins Feb. 24 and ends March 2.

  • Extension educational meetings

    Goat and beef producers may find these October programs of interest:

  • Using social media wisely

    Social media are very much a part of our culture, and many young people and adults regularly use the sites to connect with their friends and family. When used appropriately, social media can be very positive. When misused, there can be serious consequences for a family. Instances of cyberbullying and sexting have increased with the popularity of social media. In some cases, thieves have used social media accounts to find their next victims.

  • Jenna Rowlett completes prestigious SCATS program

    The Center for Gifted Studies hosted the 30th annual Summer Camp for Academically Talented Middle School Students June 10 - June 22, 2012, for nearly 200 campers, both residential and non-residential. Among those participating in the prestigious program were Jenna Rowlett, an eighth grader at Trimble County Middle School. Located on the campus of Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, Ky., SCATS provides enhanced learning opportunities for academically talented sixth, seventh, and eighth grade students.  

  • Milton Fire & Rescue urges residents to ‘have two ways out!’

    If you woke up to a fire in your home, how much time do you think you would have to get to safety? According to the nonprofit National Fire Protection Association, one-third of Americans households who made and estimate they thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life threatening. Unfortunately, the time available is often less.