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Today's Features

  • None of us live long until we discover for ourselves that not everything we encounter on life’s journey is really “real.” It doesn’t make any difference what area of life it may be, there seems to always be a counterfeit for the genuine.

  • For the past few years I’ve been following on social media the true-life saga of a lost child.

    The child is an adult, but he’s still a child to his frantic mother – and to God.

    The son is in his mid- to late-20s I think, and has been living on the streets off and on for a few years, depending on his drug addiction.

    When he’s sober, he works. But when he’s not, well, his mom isn’t sure how he makes his money to support his addiction or feed himself or find a place to sleep.

  • Asian long-horned ticks are small, reddish brown ticks with no distinctive markings to aid in quick recognition. Unfed adults are smaller (3 to 4 mm long) than the other hard ticks we commonly encounter.

  • Unless you talk about it or document your end-of-life wishes, most family’s will not know what you want and this can cause a lot of stress and anxiety on family members.

    Written records of patient wishes can improve quality of end-of-life care and help a person die with dignity.  Conversation Project is a public engagement campaign to promote end-of-life planning discussions.  According to AARP, the following steps may help you begin the conversation:

  • I’ve had more ludicrous surprises while driving than most people I know. Of course ludicrous surprises in any setting are my forte. I’ve become tentative at the wheel because I never know what’s coming next. What I do know is it will be unexpected.

  • BY CHARLES LISTON | Special to the Banner

    Helping today’s students prepare and apply for post-secondary training and college is a major challenge in the ever-changing higher education world.

    Kyle Helton, in his new position this year as academic dean at Trimble County Junior/Senior High School, works with the high school students to guide them college and post-high school application processes, including letters of reference, resume development and type of college-level course selection.

  • Last week I spoke at a women’s luncheon at a local church.

    The woman who invited me told me that their theme was thankfulness.

    That was several months ago when the sky was blue, the humidity was low and I think someone brought in cake to work that day, so of course I said I’d love to talk about being thankful.

    After all, it’s easy to give thanks when all is well.

    And then in the weeks leading up to my talk, life just sort of fell apart. In many ways it feels like the gates of hell opened up and dumped on my family.

  • We are all overwhelmed these days. We are focused on what happened yesterday and what is going to happen tomorrow. We often forget to stop and focus on the present moment we are in. When we try to focus on the present we feel inspired and happy. It is not an easy journey. Here are some ideas to move forward along this path.

  • Sometime ago, I read a humorous fictitious manual for those who volunteer in the Peace Corps.

    There was a particular portion directed to those who would be heading to South America. The manual gave specific advice to the volunteers on how to handle an encounter with an anaconda. One of the largest constrictor type snakes in the world. The advice given comes with the heading, “What to do if attacked by an Anaconda?” Here is the list:

    If you are attacked by an anaconda do not run. The snake is faster than you are.

    Lie flat on the ground.

  • Years ago, my granddaughter Caroline couldn’t be trusted to not make a run for it in a crowd.

    As a toddler, she was notorious for breaking loose from my daughter’s grasp and taking off running. She was also fearless and overly friendly when it came to approaching strangers and, if given the chance, would follow anyone anywhere, especially if offered candy or a puppy or a sip of Diet Coke.