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Today's Features

  • Sam Burgess went on vacation to Ocean Isle, N.C. with a few of his family members and they brought along the Trimble Banner to read in their spare time. Pictured left to right are Mark Sawyer, Sherri Sawyer, Sam Burgess, Gwen Fothergill Knight, Linda Brown, Holly Hughes Yowler, Robert Yowler, and Benetta Knight. 

    Planning a getaway for fall break or later this year? Take along a copy of the Banner and send a picture of the family with the newspaper to editor@mytrimblenews.com.

  • As the story goes, a group of tourists on an African safari hired several native porters to carry their supplies.

    After three days, the porters announced they needed to stop and rest for a while. However, they didn’t appear to be tired, so the tourists asked why they needed to stop.

    One of the porters said, “We are not tired, but we have walked too far too fast and now we must wait for our souls to catch up.”

    I thoroughly understand. Often I go too far too fast and life zips by and my soul is somewhere else, left behind in the dust.

  • We all know we should exercise every day for better health. But fitting it in can be tricky with the demands of home, family and career. If you have fallen off the exercise wagon before you know how easy it is once you miss one day to skip the next one.

    That’s why it is so important for us to make exercise a daily habit. Research suggests it takes 21 days of doing an activity before it becomes a habit. Actually, if the habit is a new or a harder one (like exercise), it can take the average person up to 66 days to form a strong habit.

  • BY CHARLES LISTON | Special to the Trimble Banner

    Thousands of miles from Bray Orchards and Roadside Market, manager Jamae Pyles and fellow traveler Cecilia Oak got to see an array of farm products grown and marketed in Alaska.

  • BY CHARLES LISTON | Special to the Trimble Banner

    Thousands of miles from Bray Orchards and Roadside Market, manager Jamae Pyles and fellow traveler Cecilia Oak got to see an array of farm products grown and marketed in Alaska.

  • Lacie Jamerson of Ghent, Ky. and Evan Simmons of Milton, Ky. announce their engagement and August wedding.

    The bride-to-be is the daughter of Nicole Jamerson of Carrollton, Ky. She is a 2015 graduate of Carroll County High School. She is employed at World Finance Corporation in Carrollton.

  • Love is a wonderful, amazing and, at times, confusing thing.

    For most of us our first experience with love is when we are born. We feel the love of our parents. We might experience our first “crush” when we are adolescents, and more than likely get our hearts broken. Then we meet, the one. That special person who we fall head-over-heels in love with. I am fortunate to have been married to my wonderful wife for 21 years, but I’ll be the first to admit that I still don’t really understand love. If we are honest, none of us truly understand real love.

  • A couple times a month I meet with a group of people who, along with me, are learning to live present tense lives.

    We are seeking to live today, right now, this moment. Not yesterday or 10 years ago, because those days are gone. Not tomorrow, or next Friday or April 30, 2047, because they’re not here yet.

    Some people live yesterday over and over and over. They dwell on what happened, what didn’t happen, what could’ve been, what they think should’ve been.

  • Depending on your weapon of choice and area of the state, deer season in Kentucky begins as early as September and runs through December.  Deer meat (venison) is as popular as ever. It is a lean meat and a great source of protein. It also adds variety to your table. Venison can be preserved and enjoyed all year long. It is an easy substitute for any meat in your favorite recipes. Follow the guidelines below for storing, cooking and preserving venison.

  • Whenever pests of landscape plants in the eastern U.S. are rated, bagworms invariably land in the top 10. Bagworms are most commonly found on evergreens, but they will feed on deciduous hosts, too.

    Bagworm feeding should be about over for the season. The insects will spend the winter as eggs in bags containing flightless female moths. A bag may contain up to 1,000 eggs. The eggs will hatch in late May or early June of the following year.