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  • Poison hemlock poses danger to livestock

    In recent months, evidence of poison hemlock is widespread in Kentucky. Poison hemlock is toxic to a wide variety of animals including birds, wildlife, cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, horses and to humans.

  • Fitness beginnings: Making workout plans

    If you are just starting to work out or looking to shake up your routine, developing a workout plan can keep you from burning out too quickly as you begin your fitness journey and help you stay focused on your goals.

    To get the results you want, your workout plan should include cardio exercises as well as strength training. Take into consideration your current fitness level and goals and customize a plan for you.

  • High summertime temps can stress farm animals

    Mother Nature has already been bringing the heat and humidity. In fact, Kentucky experienced the warmest May on record, and livestock are feeling it. Producers have options to keep livestock thriving in the summer heat.

  • Keep cool in the summertime heat

    In the midst of summer, Kentucky’s extreme temperatures, high humidity and prolonged heat can make being outdoors uncomfortable and dangerous. During this time, it’s important for you to know the signs and symptoms and prevent heat-related illnesses, such as heat exhaustion, heat cramps and the most serious heat-related illness, heat stroke (also known as sun stroke).

  • Fighting the battle with chiggers

    It’s chigger time across Kentucky. Just talking about them may make you itch. Chiggers are actually the immature stage of certain mite species. You’ll find them most often in overgrown, bushy areas. They also congregate in shady, humid areas near stream banks, under or around shade trees or in berry thickets.

    After hatching, larvae crawl around until they find and attach to a suitable host. In addition to humans, chiggers feed on a variety of wild and domestic animals, including snakes, turtles, birds, rodents and domestic pets such as dogs and cats.

  • Summertime fun without breaking the bank

    After a snowy, cold winter and a spring filled with heavy rain and thunderstorms, it’s no surprise that Kentuckians are welcoming the arrival of summer. With that excitement, however, comes the temptation to overspend. Between rising gas and grocery prices, vacations and extra expenses for summer outings such as golf, the community pool or summer camp, it can be easy to splurge. Learning simple ways to stretch your dollar will help your family enjoy the excess of summertime without breaking the bank.

  • Set a good example for sportsmanship

    Livestock shows are some of the most anticipated and recognized events at many county fairs. With area county fairs taking place or coming up soon, it’s important for parents to remember to set a good example for their children by exhibiting good sportsmanship during these popular events.

    As a parent, your behavior is so important because you serve as major influencer and important role model for your children and for other young people. They will take note of how you act when faced with an adverse situation and may emulate your behavior.

  • Protecting your skin from soaking up the sun
  • Goal setting your way to fitness improvements

    You may have recently made a decision to get healthier but may not know where to start. Adding physical activity to your routine is a great way to improve your mind, mood and body.

    Adults need 150 minutes of physical activity each week. While this may seem overwhelming, you can split up over the week, but keep it in 10-minute segments. Set an appointment and keep it with yourself each day to ensure you meet this goal.

  • Kentucky-grown asparagus, onions help healthy diets

    One of the sure signs of spring in Kentucky is the appearance of our own Kentucky Asparagus. We enjoy its fresh flavor from April through May. This versatile vegetable can be eaten raw, lightly boiled, steamed, grilled, stir fried or baked.

    Asparagus was first grown more than 2,000 years ago in the eastern Mediterranean region and was brought to America by the early colonists. It is the slender shoot of a perennial plant that ranges from pencil thin to about one-half inch in thickness. Our Kentucky farmers’ markets offer asparagus picked at its peak tenderness.