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Opinion

  • As the General Assembly readies for a return to the Capitol on January 2nd to start another legislative session, it is worth taking a look back on what has happened since the last one ended in late March.

    This period is known as the interim, and it gives my fellow legislators and me, plus constituents like you, a less-pressured environment to review issues affecting Kentucky so we’re better prepared when it is time to consider bills and take votes. These meetings generally start in June and run through the first half of December.

  • The season of frigid nights, warm gatherings, and good cheer is upon us as we prepare for 2018. This year was a whirlwind in the General Assembly as we passed historic legislation in the 2017 Session, held insightful policy discussions across the Commonwealth during the Interim, and analyzed proposed pension reform.

  • Dec. 31, 1987 (30 Years Ago)

  • For nearly 30 years now, the United Health Foundation has taken an in-depth look at our country’s collective health to see how each state stacks up. The most recent report, which came out earlier this month, has mixed news for us.

    While our overall ranking was low, at 42nd, that’s up three spots from last year. Only two states, Florida and Utah, made a bigger year-over-year jump.

  • Dec. 17, 1987 (30 Years Ago)

  • By Richard Nelson
    The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) made waves when it announced that it’s accepting girls into its ranks. This latest identity crisis for the 107-year old organization may be the straw that sinks their original mission to train young boys to become men.
    BSA’s Chief Scout Executive Michael Surbaugh cited the need to “evolve how our programs meet the needs of families interested in positive and lifelong experiences for their children.” No mention was made by Scout leadership about how they will fulfill their commitment to boys.

  • The Kentucky Standard
    When was the last time you were hungry?
    Not just, “I shouldn’t have skipped breakfast,” “I might need to take an early lunch,” “Maybe a bedtime snack is a good idea,” hungry, but really, really hungry.
    When was the last time you didn’t know when you’d be able to have your next meal? When was the last time you went to bed hungry and knew that hunger would still be there in the morning and you had no way to make it go away?

  • By Mark Haney, President
    Kentucky Farm Bureau
    The first permanent farm bill was passed in 1938 when farming was much different than it is today. But the purpose of the bill still basically remains the same; to establish and oversee programs that maintain an abundant food supply and help farm families be successful.

  • By ANDY BESHEAR
    Kentucky Attorney General
    “The single greatest threat to Kentucky is our drug epidemic.
    The crisis is killing our family and friends – it is the main source of crime in our communities and it is preventing job and economic growth. This is the crisis of our times, and we must find new ways to stop drug dealers and help those addicted recover.
    With the rapid rise of stronger, more powerful drugs like heroin, fentanyl and carfentanil, the opioid epidemic is killing more and more Kentuckians.

  • The Kentucky Hunger Initiative got off to a great start in 2016. We convened the Hunger Task Force, a group of leaders from agriculture, government, business, education, charitable organizations, and the faith community, to apply their unique skills and experiences to take on hunger in Kentucky. We held 10 regional meetings throughout the Commonwealth to study the sources of hunger, identify the unique issues that affect different regions of the Commonwealth, and take an inventory of resources that can be utilized to combat hunger in Kentucky.

  • By ANDY BESHEAR
    Kentucky Attorney General
    “Kentucky children and other vulnerable Kentuckians are increasingly becoming victims of human trafficking – a modern-day form of labor or sex slavery.
    Human trafficking victims are coerced into submission by their abusers through many immoral means, including forced dependence on drugs, violence, threats and manipulation.
    Every year in the United States, 300,000 children are at risk of becoming trafficked and the average age of a victim is 12 to 14.

  • By Jim Paxton
    The Paducah Sun
    The Electoral College system performed just as the Founders intended in the 2016 presidential election.
    The institution has taken a lot of criticism in recent years. It has been referred to as archaic, particularly after elections in which the successful candidate won both the electoral and popular votes.
    This year was different. Disappointed Hillary Clinton voters raised a hue and cry about the fact that she lost the presidency in the Electoral College despite receiving more of the popular vote than Donald Trump did.

  • By Ryan Quarles
    Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture
    The holiday season is well under way. Many of you enjoyed a bountiful Thanksgiving feast with your loved ones and will do so again during Christmas and New Year’s Day.
    But for others, the holidays aren’t so merry. More than 700,000 Kentuckians don’t always know where their next meal will come from, according to the Kentucky Association of Food Banks, a Berea-based organization whose member food banks distributed 52 million meals in all 120 Kentucky counties last year.

  • EDITOR’s NOTE: The following editorial was originally published 93 years ago in the Nov. 29, 1923 issue of The Trimble Democrat.

    This date marks the return of another Thanksgiving Day, a time when we as Americans should express our gratitude for the bountiful blessings which, through the dispensation of a kind Providence, has been meted out to us as a people.

  • The News-Enterprise
    At the conclusion of a vile presidential campaign between two major party nominees with dubious track records and questions of character, America is ready to be done with politics for a while.
    But, as always, lessons can be learned.
    First among them: Amer­ica still belongs to the people and not pollsters nor politicians.

  • By Charles Boteler, Chair
    Kentucky Judicial Campaign Conduct Committee Inc.
    In elections by districts across the state, Kentuckians will select in November six judges for family court, three for circuit court, five district court judges, and one justice for the Kentucky Supreme Court. We have selected our state judges in Kentucky by popular election since 1850. Since 1976 we have elected judges in non-partisan elections.

  • By Rick Rand

    Before the mid-1970s, special education in our country’s public schools was all but non-existent.  Many students were either outright denied the opportunity to attend because of their disability, or they received inferior instruction if they were able to enroll.

    That, thankfully, began to change in 1975, when Congress passed the Education for All Handicapped Children Act and required each state to provide appropriate services in this critical area.

  • Aug. 28, 1986 (30 Years Ago)

  • By Richard Nelson
    A Western Kentucky judge recently landed himself in hot water when the Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF) threatened a lawsuit over his refusal to perform a secular wedding. Trigg County Judge Executive Hollis Alexander was asked to perform nuptials for a Tennessee couple with an unusual request: they insisted the ceremony have no reference to God, someone Alexander believes is part of every marriage covenant.