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Opinion

  • Receiving the Commonwealth’s two-year, multi-billion dollar budget plan from our colleagues in the House highlighted one of our busiest weeks yet in the Senate as we reached the two-thirds point of the 2018 Session of the Kentucky General Assembly. Hundreds of visitors from all corners of Kentucky packed committee hearings and rallied for important causes in a week that saw no shortage of legislative activity.

  • March 10, 1988 (30 years ago)

    Trimble County Schools were selected through the Ohio Valley Education Cooperative for a five-year program to help students with severe handicaps to become less isolated and more self-sufficient, according to the Kentucky Department of Education.

    The Trimble County Retired Teachers Association elected Carl Allen to be the group’s president. Vernon Craig was elected vice president and Lola Stark was elected secretary-treasurer.

  • The waters have receded since this time last week and hopefully the river levels trend toward normal. Despite the damage done, stories shared by others online help show that here in small towns, we persevere through whatever is thrown at us.

  • Over the last week, heavy rains and strong winds caused widespread destruction across Kentucky. Sustained rainfall has led to devastating flooding in many communities, especially along the Ohio River.

  • After weeks of anticipation and months of discussions and meetings with stakeholders, the Kentucky Senate Majority Caucus filed its comprehensive pension reform bill as Senate Bill (SB) 1 on Tuesday, Feb. 20. While SB 1 marked the filing of one of the most significant pieces of legislation of the 2018 Session, we continued to hold committee meetings and voted bills out of the Senate chamber, making for another busy week in Frankfort.

  • Although it wasn’t his intention, Governor Bevin’s plan to radically change Kentucky’s public retirement systems has sparked a textbook example of democracy in action.

    Since he and other legislative leaders presented a framework of ideas last fall, there have been dozens of public forums, hundreds of people crowding the Capitol’s hallways and thousands of letters, phone messages and emails – almost all of which have been in opposition to what the governor would like to do.

  • March 3, 1988 (30 years ago)

  • My work as a state legislator may not have much in common with a doctor’s, but when I am considering which bills to support or oppose, I keep that profession’s primary rule in mind: First, do no harm.

    That doesn’t mean there aren’t tough decisions to be made. In an era where costs are outpacing revenues, we’re just not able to do all we would like.

    At the same time, I believe the state needs to do the most good for the most people whenever possible, which is why some of the legislation being considered this year raises concerns.

  • Feb. 25, 1988 (30 years ago)

    The Trimble County Historical Society worked on the publication of a yearbook that would have between 50 to 100 pages of historical articles and information and would be free to paid members of the society or available for $10 per copy. The society collected Bible records, Revolutionary War and Civil War pension applications, riverboat landings and more. Membership in the society at the time cost $10 per person or $15 per family.

  • Feb. 18, 1988

    (30 years ago)

    The Trimble County Rescue Squad purchased the Jaws of Life. The equipment was bought with money borrowed from the bank and members planned to sell baked goods and take donations in order to pay off the purchase. “This is one of the best tools ever purchased,” said Sheriff Howard Long. “We’ve called Madison three different times last year. With these here, we won’t have to call them. It’s essential to have such a tool, it’s a tool that can save time and lives.”

  • As a bill, the state budget isn’t particularly long, but it’s not a quick read, either, with blocks of text periodically broken up by rows of numbers.

  • Last December, Bernie Sanders, a liberal Senator from Vermont, led every single Senate Democrat to impose an endowment tax of around $1 million per year on Berea College.

  • The one thing a legislative session guarantees is that no two days are alike. My House colleagues and I may spend an hour or more debating a bill that could have a profound impact on education or public safety, and then pivot to discuss another important to farming.

    Since some bills move through the committee system faster than others, their arrival before the full chamber is generally not coordinated. And yet, it is not uncommon for themes to emerge, as one did last week.

  • This week was the busiest yet in Frankfort with a number of bills moving through committees and on to the Senate and House floors for votes. We were also visited by a number of statewide advocacy groups that championed their great causes and rallied in the Capitol Rotunda. Between visiting constituents, committee meetings, and voting on the Senate floor, we continued to discuss the upcoming budget.

  • Feb. 11, 1988 (30 years ago)

    The Trimble County plant for Louisville Gas and Electric was 50 percent complete, although the utility was fighting a battle to prove the plant’s future power would be enough for rate increases.

  • In ways large and small, illegal drug use touches all of us. It steals the future of those addicted, it tears at the lives of their loved ones, it fills our prisons beyond capacity, it strains local and state government budgets, it overwhelms first responders and substance-abuse treatment programs and it keeps businesses from finding the workers they need.

  • Feb. 4, 1988 (30 years ago)

    More than 70 citizens packed the Trimble County courtroom to discuss concerns about Valley View Landfill accepting waste from as far away as New Jersey. Laidlaw Waste Systems, owners of the landfill, filed a request to expand the refuse site by 300 acres. The facility’s permit allowed 80 acres. Judge Jack Couch said although the community development committee was studying alternatives, there were no moves made to adopt an ordinance for planning and zoning in the county.

  • Jan. 28, 1988 (30 years ago)

    Tri-County Emergency Transport began operating two ambulances out of Pendleton for patients in Trimble, Henry and Oldham counties. Chuck Smith, president, Roger Taylor, vice president, and Scott Burrows, secretary/treasurer led the organization. Seven certified EMTs from Trimble County worked for the service, including the Burrows, Nina Thompson, Marsha Campbell, Linda Callis, Donnie Callis and Susan Brady.

  • Despite the slick roads and thick accumulation of snow across the Commonwealth, the Kentucky General Assembly returned ready to work following the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend. The general atmosphere in the Capitol was one of anticipation as citizens rallied for causes in the Rotunda and met with their legislators throughout the week.

  • Most days during a legislative session, it is not uncommon to see supporters in the Capitol Rotunda rallying for a variety of important causes. Each event may be different, but they collectively serve as powerful reminders that the votes we in the House and Senate take just two floors away have a real impact on the direction Kentucky takes.