• Nov. 28, 1985 (30 years ago)

  • September 17 marked the 228th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution. It’s the longest surviving constitution among nations today, perhaps because it protects basic human rights, secures individual liberty and provides checks and balances from an overreaching federal government that would infringe on freedom. It’s something to celebrate, but most Americans don’t know what it says.

  • Editor:
    A huge thank you to the Trimble community supporting the 2nd Annual Christopher Goodin Blood Drive. Thirty units were collected on a goal of 25.
    Gabrielle Murray
    TCHS Student Coordinator
    Jamie Smith
    TCHS Student Worker
    Carla G. Goins
    Gifted Education Coordinator Trimble County Schools

  • At a recent House Rules committee hearing, one of my colleagues from New York declared that the potholes in the roads in her district are so bad, “you can lose your car in them.”  Kentuckians and Americans from all over the country agree. It is long past time that something was done to address the deplorable state of the highways and infrastructure in this country.

  • By John Crabtree
    Center for Rural Affairs
    On May 27, 2015, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers finalized their proposed Clean Water Rule to protect the streams and wetlands that form the foundation of the nation’s water resources from pollution and degradation.

  • Lexington Herald Leader
    Regulations issued last week by the Environmental Protection Agency for waste from coal-fired power plants are welcome but fall short of fully protecting the public.
    Coal ash — the residue left over after coal is burned to produce electricity — contains varying amounts of carcinogenic and toxic metals such as arsenic, barium and lead.
    Kentucky produces about 9 million tons a year of the waste, which is stored in ponds and landfills.

  • We’ve all been sifting through the events of last Friday, and I think it’s entirely appropriate for the Senate to take a moment to acknowledge the victims of this nightmarish rampage, their families, and the wider community of Aurora.

    In the life of a nation, some events are just so terrible that they compel all of us to set aside our normal routines and preoccupations, step back, reflect on our own motivations and priorities, and think about the kind of lives we all aspire to live.

    This is certainly one of them.

  • For most of Kentucky’s history, we have found a way to go above and beyond the call of duty when it comes to protecting our country.

    During the War of 1812, for example, Kentucky suffered more casualties than all other states combined.  In the decade since Sept. 11, 2001, meanwhile, no military base has seen more deployments than Fort Campbell.

    Last week, the nation turned its attention to the Kentuckian who became the latest recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, the highest award that anyone in the military can receive.

  • 30 Years Ago

    April 23,1981

    The iron gates at the entranceway of Moffett Cemetery were stolen Thursday or Friday of last week. Placed there more than 90 years ago, the gates definitely are antique vintage and, doubtless, very valuable. Vincent Oakley discovered the gates missing Saturday morning. He said the gates would be easily identified by the lions’ heads so decoratively atop the iron uprights of the gates.

  • The first shots of the War Between the States were fired upon Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, S.C., 150 years ago on April 12, 1861.

    The Louisville Journal speculated that Kentucky Gov. Beriah Magoffin would attempt to join the Confederacy in secession from the United States of America.

    Magoffin was a state’s rights advocate and believed in the right to secede. Further, he sympathized with the Confederate cause.

  • I’m already on the record for being in favor of the Trimble County Board of Education’s plan to possibly build a new baseball/softball/tennis complex for high school athletes.
    Personally, I think it would be a boost to the entire community, and would have a positive impact on students at the high school and, eventually, in the lower grades.

  • Editor:   This is a letter of appreciation to the services provided to my wife and me this past Saturday morning (Oct. 9) following our boat accident near Hanover Beach. The intra-agency cooperation between Kentucky and Indiana emergency services and nonemergency services (Clifty Creek Power Plant tow secured through the efforts of your crew) was impressive. The professionalism and compas

  • I would like to extend my gratitude to the Kentucky Press Association, the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues, and the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center at the University of Kentucky. Spurred by a suggestion I made to KPA Executive Director David Thompson last month, these three Kentucky journalism heavy-hitters have scheduled a Sunshine Seminar for 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thur

  • Editor: We are the citizens of Stauffer Farms in southern Trimble County. We have been pleading with the county for the last year to pave Stauffer Drive, which is a gravel road. The dust is choking us and is straining our air-conditioning units. Magistrate Kirby Melvin disregards our calls and ignores our complaints. We have been attending Fiscal Court meetings every month, pleading our

  • Editor: The Trimble County Emergency Search Unit has had a good year. We have had several members certified in “man tracking,” basic search and rescue, and wilderness/advanced first aid. We would like to say thank-you to everyone who helped by buying ice cream at our fund-raising booths at the Trimble County Fair, the Bedford Bash and the Trimble County Apple Festival. We do appre

  • Editor: Halloween in Trimble County is 6-8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 30. Here are some simple ways to make trick-or-treating a safe experience for children. Many Halloween accidents, from skinned knees to pedestrian traffic fatalities, can be traced to a child’s inability to see steps, curbs and vehicles because of ill-fitting masks. Be sure your child’s mask so that he or she can see obs

  • Editor: I read the letter last week in the paper of the case of A.A. Martin and Donnie Ketterer. I don’t know all about the case but, what I know it’s a tragedy for all. Members of my family have had the misfortune of dealing with the justice system in Carroll County and I’m sorry to say it’s anything but justice for all. Barbara Shepherd Carrollton  

  • Editor: It may be of some concern to the people of this county, when there is an injustice being done. I am an outsider to this town, but just the same I can feel what is right and what is wrong. I am referring to the case of A.A. Martin and Donnie Ketterer. This is all in the same on each side a tragedy. An untimely death of such a young man. However, how do you explain the fact that there

  • With all the anger at the grassroots level for perceived overspending by government, and news stories about bankrupted cities and states, I’m intrigued by comments I’ve overheard from people who are complaining that Trimble County School District is “sitting on millions of dollars” in its budget. It is true. The district does have a considerable amount of money in its re

  • Editor: I would like to address the parents of girls 8-18 years old who live in the county and are interested in fast-pitch softball. I know winter is coming, but to have a good turnout this spring, we have to start planning now. Trimble County Youth Softball League is accepting nominations for anyone interested in serving on the board. Plan to attend our next meeting at 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct.