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Opinion

  • By Ryan Quarles
    Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture
    The holiday season is well under way. Many of you enjoyed a bountiful Thanksgiving feast with your loved ones and will do so again during Christmas and New Year’s Day.
    But for others, the holidays aren’t so merry. More than 700,000 Kentuckians don’t always know where their next meal will come from, according to the Kentucky Association of Food Banks, a Berea-based organization whose member food banks distributed 52 million meals in all 120 Kentucky counties last year.

  • EDITOR’s NOTE: The following editorial was originally published 93 years ago in the Nov. 29, 1923 issue of The Trimble Democrat.

    This date marks the return of another Thanksgiving Day, a time when we as Americans should express our gratitude for the bountiful blessings which, through the dispensation of a kind Providence, has been meted out to us as a people.

  • The News-Enterprise
    At the conclusion of a vile presidential campaign between two major party nominees with dubious track records and questions of character, America is ready to be done with politics for a while.
    But, as always, lessons can be learned.
    First among them: Amer­ica still belongs to the people and not pollsters nor politicians.

  • By Charles Boteler, Chair
    Kentucky Judicial Campaign Conduct Committee Inc.
    In elections by districts across the state, Kentuckians will select in November six judges for family court, three for circuit court, five district court judges, and one justice for the Kentucky Supreme Court. We have selected our state judges in Kentucky by popular election since 1850. Since 1976 we have elected judges in non-partisan elections.

  • By Rick Rand

    Before the mid-1970s, special education in our country’s public schools was all but non-existent.  Many students were either outright denied the opportunity to attend because of their disability, or they received inferior instruction if they were able to enroll.

    That, thankfully, began to change in 1975, when Congress passed the Education for All Handicapped Children Act and required each state to provide appropriate services in this critical area.

  • Aug. 28, 1986 (30 Years Ago)

  • By Richard Nelson
    A Western Kentucky judge recently landed himself in hot water when the Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF) threatened a lawsuit over his refusal to perform a secular wedding. Trigg County Judge Executive Hollis Alexander was asked to perform nuptials for a Tennessee couple with an unusual request: they insisted the ceremony have no reference to God, someone Alexander believes is part of every marriage covenant.

  • By Al Cross
    Courier-Journal
    As Gov. Matt Bevin continues what may be the greatest recoupment of executive power in Frankfort since the 1947-50 gubernatorial term of Democrat Earle Clements (who had no meaningful Republican opposition), most of the talk in the state capital is about executive orders reorganizing boards that are supposed to have varying degrees of independence.

  • Joint opinion by Gov. Matt Bevin and Justice and Public Safety Cabinet Sec. John Tilley

    We’ve reached a critical point in Kentucky – one where our prisons and jails are full, overdose deaths continue to rise and far too many children have parents who are imprisoned.
    We can no longer afford to cling to the outdated idea that prison is the only way to effectively hold people accountable for their crimes. Instead, we need to take a smarter, more measured approach to criminal justice.

  • Bowling Green Daily News

    “But in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract.”
    As we remember President Abraham Lincoln’s words from his famous Gettysburg address, we are reminded that the Memorial Day holiday should be a time of reflection.

  • Guest Editorial Courtesy               The Courier-Journal

    House Speaker Greg Stumbo is grandstanding. Plain and simple. And it’s time to bring an end to it.

  • Nov. 28, 1985 (30 years ago)

  • September 17 marked the 228th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution. It’s the longest surviving constitution among nations today, perhaps because it protects basic human rights, secures individual liberty and provides checks and balances from an overreaching federal government that would infringe on freedom. It’s something to celebrate, but most Americans don’t know what it says.

  • Editor:
    A huge thank you to the Trimble community supporting the 2nd Annual Christopher Goodin Blood Drive. Thirty units were collected on a goal of 25.
    Gabrielle Murray
    TCHS Student Coordinator
    Jamie Smith
    TCHS Student Worker
    Carla G. Goins
    Gifted Education Coordinator Trimble County Schools
     

  • At a recent House Rules committee hearing, one of my colleagues from New York declared that the potholes in the roads in her district are so bad, “you can lose your car in them.”  Kentuckians and Americans from all over the country agree. It is long past time that something was done to address the deplorable state of the highways and infrastructure in this country.

  • By John Crabtree
    Center for Rural Affairs
    On May 27, 2015, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers finalized their proposed Clean Water Rule to protect the streams and wetlands that form the foundation of the nation’s water resources from pollution and degradation.

  • Lexington Herald Leader
    Regulations issued last week by the Environmental Protection Agency for waste from coal-fired power plants are welcome but fall short of fully protecting the public.
    Coal ash — the residue left over after coal is burned to produce electricity — contains varying amounts of carcinogenic and toxic metals such as arsenic, barium and lead.
    Kentucky produces about 9 million tons a year of the waste, which is stored in ponds and landfills.

  • We’ve all been sifting through the events of last Friday, and I think it’s entirely appropriate for the Senate to take a moment to acknowledge the victims of this nightmarish rampage, their families, and the wider community of Aurora.

    In the life of a nation, some events are just so terrible that they compel all of us to set aside our normal routines and preoccupations, step back, reflect on our own motivations and priorities, and think about the kind of lives we all aspire to live.

    This is certainly one of them.

  • For most of Kentucky’s history, we have found a way to go above and beyond the call of duty when it comes to protecting our country.

    During the War of 1812, for example, Kentucky suffered more casualties than all other states combined.  In the decade since Sept. 11, 2001, meanwhile, no military base has seen more deployments than Fort Campbell.

    Last week, the nation turned its attention to the Kentuckian who became the latest recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, the highest award that anyone in the military can receive.

  • 30 Years Ago

    April 23,1981

    The iron gates at the entranceway of Moffett Cemetery were stolen Thursday or Friday of last week. Placed there more than 90 years ago, the gates definitely are antique vintage and, doubtless, very valuable. Vincent Oakley discovered the gates missing Saturday morning. He said the gates would be easily identified by the lions’ heads so decoratively atop the iron uprights of the gates.