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Features

  • The Trimble Banner

    While local and state officials consider the Milton-Madison Bridge obsolete, a pair of peregrine falcons seem to think it’s a great place to raise a family.

    The falcon pair is raising four chicks – three females and one male – in a nesting box provided by the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife on one of the piers on the Milton side of the Ohio River.

  • A local pharmacist took part in the federal government process this month, traveling to Washington, D.C., with a group of his peers to urge Congress and the Obama administration to remember community pharmacies when they set to work developing a federal health-care reform plan.

    Bob Yowler of Morgan’s Drug Store in Bedford traveled to the nation’s capital May 11-13 for the National Community Pharmacists Association conference.

  • The Trimble Banner

    Each year, judo instructor Debbie Crawford spends a week or two of her vacation giving free self-defense classes to girls in middle and high school.

    At Trimble County High School last Wednesday, Crawford spent time in the gymnasium with girls from each of the morning physical education classes. That afternoon, she took her safety lessons to girls at Trimble County Middle School.

  • Trimble County Relay for Life is making great strides in the campaign to fight cancer. More than  40 people attended the April 28 meeting, and 400 registration forms have been turned in.

    The events this year will be as varied as the teams. Along with yard sales and car washes, there will be a “Cutie Pie” contest, a bike rally, a tractor ride and chances to win different prizes.

  • It was only a drill, but it was very realistic.

  •  The Trimble County High School 2009 Prom was held Saturday, April 25, at Hanover College in Hanover, Ind. Promgoers had a great time dancin' and romancin' and watching new Principal Stirling Sampson take his turn – tuxedo and all – on the floor. 

  • The News-Democrat

    Quilters, teachers, county agents and hostesses filled every empty room at General Butler State Park April 14 and 15, last Tuesday and Wednesday as they learned new quilting techniques.

    Teachers from Kentucky, Indiana, Nebraska and Texas came together to teach students from the surrounding area many different ways to piece and quilt comforters, clothing, bags, table runners and other items.

  • The News-Democrat

    A local committee is investigating the possibility of forming a Big Brothers/Big Sisters program in Carroll County. Area residents are invited to explore the role of mentors in the lives of local children at a meeting to be held at 6 p.m., Mon., May 4, at the Carroll County Extension Office. The purpose of forming an organization of this type would be to help children reach their potential through professionally supported one-on-one relationships with measurable impact.

  • The Trimble Banner

    Adults in Trimble County who may be thinking about going back to school – either to obtain a GED or to earn a college degree – have more options to help them prepare for these goals.

    The Trimble County Adult Learning Center, a program offered by Jefferson Community and Technical College at the Carrollton campus, is now staffed by two instructors. Lisa Moore and Angela Stethen. Both women have worked as substitute teachers in the county schools, and are the primary instructors for the adult programs.

  • The News-Democrat

    Moving a 375,000-pound generator is a lot like moving a football field — a lot of equipment is needed to get the job done.

    On Thursday morning, passersby and workers were treated to such a sight when one of the longest trailers ever seen in Carroll County began moving a generator from the barge dock at North American Stainless to Smith Station, a member of the East Kentucky Power Cooperative in Clark County.

  • The Easter Bunny made the rounds Saturday in Trimble County, attending Easter Egg Hunts held at Mount Hermon Church on Kings Ridge Road and at Trimble County Park, co-hosted by the Milton Volunteer Fire Department and Emergency Squad and Milton Baptist Church.

    Winners of The Trimble Banner’s 2009 Easter Coloring Contest were chosen this week.

      .

  • The News-Democrat

    Students who went to the English School for any length of time are invited to a reunion-planning meeting to try to reconstruct the timeline and friendships of a bygone era.

    Sue Leite, a former student there from 1950 until 1958, is spearheading the reunion and has planned an organizational meeting for 1 p.m.  Friday, April 17, at the English Christian Church at 3477 State Hwy. 389 in English.

  • The News-Democrat

    Two distant cousins find they have similar plans for improving their career prospects through furthering their educations.

     In a down economy, they agree that getting additional education is one of the best ways to assure someone of keeping a job or getting a better job.

  • Special to The News-Democrat

    Local Students from surrounding counties visited 16 different establishments Monday not for a regular field trip but to place themselves in the employee’s shoes for a day.

    Students from Gallatin, Trimble, Owen, and Carroll counties started their school day off like any regular day; but instead of attending class they attended Job Shadowing Day at CCATC (Carroll County Area Technology Center). Shadowing gives students the chance to experience what it would be like if they chose that path for a career.

  • After 14 years of day and night seizures, Hannah Marsh has been seizure-free for five months.  

    Hannah, an 18-year-old senior at Carroll County High School, has suffered from seizures since she was 4. Doctors could find no reason for the seizures, which occur mainly at night. She has had as many as 40 in one night.

    This changed five months ago when she underwent brain surgery at Vanderbilt University Hospital in Nashville, Tenn. The surgery removed part of Hannah’s brain where the seizures originated; that portion of her brain had begun to turn black.

  • Stepping down as vice president of the Carroll County Arts Commission, Jim Fothergill encouraged all arts commission members to attend the next meeting, set for 6:30 p.m. Thursday, March 19, in the community room at the Carroll County Public Library.

    Members will be electing a new president and vice president. Current president Mark Davis also is stepping down from his position.

    Fothergill spoke during the March 5 meeting, during which he’d hoped the election could be held. However, only a handful of members attended that meeting.

  • An invasion of sorts is coming to the Family Worship Center, and young people from sixth-grade up to age 25 are invited to attend.

    The Invasion Tour, a division of Go-Ministries, will bring its high-energy traveling show to the church, located on State Hwy. 227, in Carrollton, on Friday and Saturday, March 13-14. The show begins each evening at 7 p.m., with a pre-service prayer at 6:15 p.m.

    The Invasion Tour includes a Christian-rock band, skits and a short dramatic play.

  • Two local artists from different generations – but with similar styles – are showing their works at the Carroll County Public Library this month.

    Mike Anderson and Will Crase each have a showing that is modern, employs lots of color and represents things they say are important in their own lives.

    Anderson, an employee at North American Stainless, is a 1988 graduate of Eastern Kentucky University, where he earned  a bachelor’s degree in fine arts and graphic design.

  • Many area residents took advantage of a chance Saturday to have experts appraise their treasures during Personal Treasures Day at Butler-Turpin State Historic House.

    Similar to the PBS show, “Antiques Roadshow,” Historic House site manager Evelyn Welch invited Ron Langdon and Jack Bailey, also historic site managers with Kentucky Department of Parks, and Brad Miller of Cornerstone Society of Madison, Ind., a preservation to be appraisers.