•  30 Years Ago (April 16, 1981)
    Work is pacing along ahead of schedule on the extensions to Trimble Water District No. 1, and work is 55 percent complete overall, Merle Jackson, commissioner, said this week. Jackson said after the 26 miles is completed, 122 new users will be served.

  • Editor’s note: The following is the conclusion of the story of Seaman first class George Stanley Abbott, the last Trimble County casualty of World War II.

    George Stanley Abbott, Seaman first class, United States Naval Reserve, was aboard the U.S.S. Indianapolis when—shortly after 12 a.m. on July 30, 1945—the large cruiser-class warship was rocked by explosions. Two Japanese torpedoes detonated near her bow. Abbott, a Trimble County farm boy, had joined the Navy two years earlier.

  • Bedford Elementary School 3rd grade student, Drew Burkhardt, attended his first Bedford Rotary Club meeting last week.  Aaron Stover was the guest speaker of the March 29th meeting.  Stover from Michael Baker, Jr., Inc. is the spokesperson for the new Milton Madison Bridge Project.  He presented the Rotary club with current information pertaining to the Ohio River Bridge.

  • Editor’s note: The following is the first of a series of monthly columns about historical incidents from Trimble County’s past. The column title is taken from the ripples that still roll across the remains of the old Milton dike long submerged in the Ohio River. Many of the long-forgotten events of our past still cast shadows over our way of life today and create ripples that continue to lap at the shores of the river of life upon which we are all mariners.

  • 30 Years Ago (April 2, 1981)

  • 30 Years Ago
    March 26, 1981

    A skeleton was found Sunday afternoon fastened in tree roots on the river bank in Spring Creek bottom.

    Forrest Burkhardt was walking along the Ohio River about a quarter ‘till 5, when he noticed the human skeleton ensnarled in tree roots left exposed by the undercutting of the water. Obviously it is surmised that the skeleton was washed in and lodged amid the roots.

  • 50 Years Ago (March 23, 1961)
    Prospects are building up for a most exciting county election year, and the races may take on a torrid complexion before May 23. Filing is still open and will be until April 8. Dallas Ogden is in the County Clerk’s race against Wallace Wright, and Ernest Rowlett is running against Tommie Powell for Magistrate in the Bedford-Barebone district. Other filings are Howard Long filed for Sheriff; Orville Smith and Norman D. Young have filed in their respective districts; Merchant Colbert filed for Trimble County sheriff.

  • Area residents will have an opportunity this spring to purchase plants raised from seed by Trimble County High School agriculture students.

    “The students are starting plants from seed to grow in the greenhouse,” TCHS agriculture teacher Jo Ann Gripshover said. “They are watching them germinate, transplanting them to bigger pots or cell packs, and making hanging baskets. We are growing petunias, morning glories, marigolds, zinnias, etc., and some vegetables.”

  • 30 Years Ago --
    March 12, 1981

  • Students at Milton Elementary School recently jumped all over heart disease and stroke by participating in Jump Rope For Heart. The school had set a goal to raise $1,500 but far exceeded that goal, collecting a total of $7508.93 for the American Heart Association.

  • 30 Years Ago —
    Feb. 26, 1981

  • When Metro-Goldwyn-Meyer announced in July 1958 that a new movie starring Frank Sinatra would be filmed in and around the Madison area, the rush of excitement in the region was overwhelming.

    Movie stars, production crew and gaffers by the busload swarmed into the area in early August, and Madison was transformed into a multi-block Hollywood movie set. Director Vincente Minelli, actresses Shirley MacLaine and Martha Hyer, and actors Dean Martin and Arthur Kennedy were among those joining Sinatra in town for the production of “Some Came Running.”

  • High stress levels and a severe skin rash were conditions that prompted Max to come to me for a health consultation.
    He had what could be defined as a “Bah, Humbug” personality. Max had chronic negative attitudes, which can cause biochemical changes leading to toxic conditions throughout the organs and glands. Chronic skin eruptions resulted as the toxicity flushed out his pores.
    Overworked, his liver – the main toxicity-filtering system in the body – was suppressed.

  • For nearly three months, there’s been a new chief in Milton.

    Jason Long took over as chief of the Milton Volunteer Fire and Rescue Department in early September, a few weeks after longtime Chief Ronnie Barnes announced his retirement.

  • A  Shining STAR Customer Service training program that I attended a couple of weeks ago is even more important to us now with the announcement that Kentucky Speedway will host a NASCAR Sprint Cup race July 9, 2011. Carrollton and Carroll County have just a little more than 10 months to prepare fo

  • Journeyman Steve Young recently visited Carrollton during one of his journeys across the country to raise awareness for the Victory Junction Gang Camp, a camp for sick and terminally ill children in Randleman, N.C. According to their website, the camp opened in 2004 and has served more than 11,000 children and families from 47 states and th

  • Auctions are a place where learning to detect and interpret even the most minute change of body language is key.  As the amplified voice of the owner and auctioneer, David Neville, rambles the increment prices of the merchandise, most of the communication on the floor of Capstone Produce Market was being done through looks, small nods of the head and quick hand gestures. Othe

  • The property stands idle after a 50-year history of service as a summer residential camping facility for special needs individuals from the summer of 1960 until May 29, 2010. When first opened, Camp Kysoc was considered to be a premiere camping facility for special needs children and the first of its kind in the nation. During the years of o

  • Shawn Keeton’s life has been a “Culinary Expedition.” After a lifetime of exposure to and learning about good cooking, Keeton has two cookbooks and a cooking show in the works, and he teaches cooking classes once a month at the local extension office. His love of cooking was conceived as a child when he watched his grand

  • Carrollton residents Willie B. and Mary Ricketts reached a major milestone in their journey through life together, celebrating their 75th wedding anniversary July 4. Their achievement was recognized in letters from President Barack Obama and Gov. Steve Beshear. The couple has three children, 12 grandchildren, six step grandchildren, 17 great-grand and step great-grandchildren, tw