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Today's Opinions

  • Kentucky has a rich history in the arts

    While Kentucky is widely recognized for such things as fried chicken, horses and bourbon, it could be argued that our connections to the arts are just as considerable.

    Legend has it, for example, that Kentucky was the first state to see a performance of a Beethoven symphony, which was conducted in Lexington in 1817.

    Several weeks ago, meanwhile, the world marked the 100th birthday of an American legend, William “Bill” Monroe, the founder of Bluegrass music whose Ohio County home has become a shrine to many.

  • Legislator reviews KSP report on state highway safety

    While no one can accurately predict where a traffic accident might take place, information gathered by the Kentucky State Police gives us a pretty good idea of when the odds are certainly more in our favor.

    Based on its latest annual report, which was released last week, one of the safest places to be on the highway in 2010 was in a vehicle driven at dawn on a Sunday in March by a woman in her late 60s or early 70s who was making her way between Owensboro and Henderson on the Audubon Parkway.

  • Kentuckians’ sacrifices remembered

    For most of Kentucky’s history, we have found a way to go above and beyond the call of duty when it comes to protecting our country.

    During the War of 1812, for example, Kentucky suffered more casualties than all other states combined.  In the decade since Sept. 11, 2001, meanwhile, no military base has seen more deployments than Fort Campbell.

    Last week, the nation turned its attention to the Kentuckian who became the latest recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, the highest award that anyone in the military can receive.

  • Letter to the Editor

    Appreciation expressed to all who contributed to success of Apple Festival
    Editor:

  • A makeover for our courthouse cannon?

    We’ve all seen them, those items of armament from wars fought long ago displayed in the public squares of small towns in rural America. They can be seen in courthouse lawns, at meeting houses of Veterans of Foreign Wars and American Legion organizations, airports, etc. They are visible reminders of battles fought, victories won, adversaries overcome, sacrifices made and “heroes proved through liberating strife,” as Katherine Lee Bates so skillfully memorialized in the lyric of “America, the Beautiful.”

  • Bedford Fire Chief writes to thank public servants for their service and sacrifice

    Editor:

    With this last week being a time of great reflection and remembering in our nation’s history I would like to take this opportunity to give thanks. I would like to thank all the service men and women who have served and are serving this great country. Your job is one with huge sacrifices and sometimes horrible consequences.

  • State has 60 nature preserves totaling 25,000 acres

    “Buy land,” Mark Twain once said.  “They’re not making any more of it.”

    That investment advice has been taken to heart by the Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission, which formally celebrated 35 years of service last week.

    Since it began, the commission has permanently set aside more than 25,000 irreplaceable acres for future generations.  Their 60 nature preserves range from the Blanton Forest near Virginia to Three Ponds along the Mississippi River.

  • Rand reflects on Sept. 11

    There are only a handful of days in which a whole country collectively remembers what it was doing.  Some have been high points in our history, like V-E and V-J Day at the end of World War II and Neil Armstrong’s first steps on the moon.  And some have been moments we wish had never occurred, like Pearl Harbor, President Kennedy’s assassination, and the tragedies of September 11, 2001.

    For those old enough to remember that last date, it seems hard to believe that 10 years have slipped by since that cool and clear morning.