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Today's Opinions

  • Looking Back and Do You Remember | March 8, 2018

    March 10, 1988 (30 years ago)

    Trimble County Schools were selected through the Ohio Valley Education Cooperative for a five-year program to help students with severe handicaps to become less isolated and more self-sufficient, according to the Kentucky Department of Education.

    The Trimble County Retired Teachers Association elected Carl Allen to be the group’s president. Vernon Craig was elected vice president and Lola Stark was elected secretary-treasurer.

  • Looking Back and Do You Remember | March 8, 2018

    March 10, 1988 (30 years ago)

    Trimble County Schools were selected through the Ohio Valley Education Cooperative for a five-year program to help students with severe handicaps to become less isolated and more self-sufficient, according to the Kentucky Department of Education.

    The Trimble County Retired Teachers Association elected Carl Allen to be the group’s president. Vernon Craig was elected vice president and Lola Stark was elected secretary-treasurer.

  • House budget rejects some proposed cuts

    When Governor Bevin presented his budget to the General Assembly in late January, it quickly became clear that his proposed cuts to education would be too much for our schools to handle.

    It would reduce elementary and secondary funding by more than $380 million over the next two years and take away almost $160 million more from our colleges and universities. That’s 540 million steps back at a time when it is more critical than ever that we have our students running ahead.

  • Now it's the Senate's turn with budget

    Receiving the Commonwealth’s two-year, multi-billion dollar budget plan from our colleagues in the House highlighted one of our busiest weeks yet in the Senate as we reached the two-thirds point of the 2018 Session of the Kentucky General Assembly. Hundreds of visitors from all corners of Kentucky packed committee hearings and rallied for important causes in a week that saw no shortage of legislative activity.

  • Despite flooding, resilient nature persists

    The waters have receded since this time last week and hopefully the river levels trend toward normal. Despite the damage done, stories shared by others online help show that here in small towns, we persevere through whatever is thrown at us.

  • McConnell's office monitoring weather impacts

    Over the last week, heavy rains and strong winds caused widespread destruction across Kentucky. Sustained rainfall has led to devastating flooding in many communities, especially along the Ohio River.

  • Pension bill filed in Kentucky Senate

    After weeks of anticipation and months of discussions and meetings with stakeholders, the Kentucky Senate Majority Caucus filed its comprehensive pension reform bill as Senate Bill (SB) 1 on Tuesday, Feb. 20. While SB 1 marked the filing of one of the most significant pieces of legislation of the 2018 Session, we continued to hold committee meetings and voted bills out of the Senate chamber, making for another busy week in Frankfort.

  • Bill undermines bipartisan work

    Although it wasn’t his intention, Governor Bevin’s plan to radically change Kentucky’s public retirement systems has sparked a textbook example of democracy in action.

    Since he and other legislative leaders presented a framework of ideas last fall, there have been dozens of public forums, hundreds of people crowding the Capitol’s hallways and thousands of letters, phone messages and emails – almost all of which have been in opposition to what the governor would like to do.