Today's Opinions

  • If the prodigal were a daughter

    A few years ago, the late Janice Chaffee wrote the book, “If the Prodigal Were A Daughter.”
    In it, she took several parables of Jesus and rewrote them, making women the main characters in 21st-century settings.
    My favorite story is her take of the parable of the prodigal son in Luke 15. She called it “Solana: A Loved Daughter.”

  • Dozen major issues to be considered

    If the end of a legislative session is about what laws the General Assembly can pass, the beginning is about what the House and Senate hope will be on that list.
    It’s not a small number this year, with about a dozen major topics expected to be considered by both chambers and many others also vying for passage. Making that process difficult is the fact that there are only 30 working days and the first four were dedicated last month to electing leadership and establishing committees for the next two years.

  • Several bills get Kentucky Senate approval

    The 2015 legislative session of the Kentucky General Assembly began “part two” of the 2015 session on Tuesday, which made for a busy week for legislators in Frankfort.
    Continuing the goal of “creating Kentucky jobs and strengthening Kentucky families,” the Senate Majority Caucus wasted no time introducing our next five priority bills and giving them a first reading on the Senate floor Tuesday.

  • Loving my neighbor: invitation pending…

    It’s been a while since I thought about skipping church because of the sermon topic, but last week I was tempted.
    At my church we’re currently going through a sermon series on “Love Thy Neighbor,” which in itself isn’t a skipping-church-worthy topic. I mean, who doesn’t agree that we should love our neighbors as we love ourselves?

  • Reader is taxed to the ‘tipping point’


  • Representative recalls the late governor, senator

    Late last week, Kentucky lost one of its true statesmen with the passing of former U.S. Senator Wendell Ford.
    Since then, there have been numerous accolades about his many accomplishments in Washington, D.C. – from helping to write and pass the Family and Medical Leave Act to promoting Kentucky’s signature coal and tobacco industries – but it is worth noting that several actions taken during his time as governor continue to benefit Kentuckians today.

  • Air Methods enjoys successful food drive

    Air Methods enjoys successful food drive

  • EPA falls short on coal ash rule

    Lexington Herald Leader
    Regulations issued last week by the Environmental Protection Agency for waste from coal-fired power plants are welcome but fall short of fully protecting the public.
    Coal ash — the residue left over after coal is burned to produce electricity — contains varying amounts of carcinogenic and toxic metals such as arsenic, barium and lead.
    Kentucky produces about 9 million tons a year of the waste, which is stored in ponds and landfills.