Today's Opinions

  • The gift of misery

    I spent this past weekend feeling sad.
    The reason isn’t important — actually, there really wasn’t a reason other than I just felt like being sad, and so I was.
    I called my sister to tell her that I was sad, but she was at her granddaughter’s soccer game and didn’t answer her phone, which made me even sadder.
    I would’ve told my husband I was sad, but he would just tell me all the reasons I have not to be sad or he’d give me a pep talk, which is not the proper response to sadness, in my opinion.

  • Honoring Kentucky’s veterans

    One hundred years ago, “the war to end all wars” ravaged Europe. What we now call World War I ended in part thanks to the more than four million Americans who mobilized to join the Allied Powers’ fight overseas. Over 100,000 of them did not return home. The war ended on November 11, 1918, and the commemoration of that day has become the holiday we now observe as Veterans Day.

  • Transition period underway for state government

    While last week’s gubernatorial election marked the end of this year’s campaign season, it also kicked off the beginning of a transition period that has been guided by tradition and the state constitution for much of our history.
    Not quite 60 people have served as governor since Kentucky joined the United States in 1792. In the beginning, voters did not have a direct say; instead, the decision was made by a group of electors, similar to our presidential elections today.

  • Bullying warning signs

    Dear Readers,
    In continuing to address the topic of bullying I want to first make a correction from last week’s article. There was a typo that made the statement “Bullying will be resolve without adult intervention.” In fact it should have said, “Bullying will not be resolved without adult intervention.” This is a very important point to be clear on. Bullying needs to be reported immediately.

  • Crossover moment to becoming a Christian

    I love a good conversion story, that moment or series of moments that lead up to a person going from not belonging to Jesus to belonging to him.
    I remember telling my friend Mike that it was like getting married. Either you are or you aren’t. I told him you can think you’re married, say you’re married, live with another person as if you’re married, but unless you’ve signed the marriage license and said, “I do,” you’re not married.

  • When Americans proved their worth

    By Heather French Henry
    Commissioner, Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs
    They were untested. Young, green American troops. To the eyes of the British and French soldiers, worn out by four years of trench warfare, the Americans looked highly unlikely to hold the line against the Germans marching on Paris.
    As Jim Yardley wrote last year in the New York Times:

  • Kentucky veterans have contributed to freedom’s cause

    On November 11th, our nation will come together as it has for nearly a century to pay tribute to those who have sacrificed their time, talents and even their lives and limbs to preserve our freedom.
    Altogether, there have been more than 40 million men and women who have been part of the U.S. Armed Forces since the Continental Army was first established 240 years ago this past June. Tens of millions more have served, or still are serving, as members of the National Guard and the Reserves, both of which trace their history back even further.

  • Deciduous Toenails

    Since my husband and I married I have gone through several sets of toenails. Sets may be a bit of an exaggeration, more like the same toenails over and over again. I’ve recently shed a big toenail; right before the trees began to drop their leaves. Another similarity to the autumn leaf is the color change. Leaves become beautiful shades of yellow, red and russet; toenails go black….