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Today's Opinions

  • Bergdahl is a traitor, sentence is a disgrace

    Bowling Green Daily News
    Bowe Bergdahl is a traitor to this country.
    There’s no better word to describe this disgrace of a human being. President Donald Trump said it best during the 2016 presidential campaign, referring to Bergdahl as “a dirty rotten traitor.”

  • Planning Advisory Board maintains state properties

    One of state government’s biggest responsibilities is constructing and managing the very buildings that house our employees, college students, prisoners and state park visitors. It is no small job, considering that we maintain 88 million square feet of space valued at $18 billion.

  • Our once-in-a-generation opportunity to overhaul our complex tax code

    Our complex tax code is in desperate need of reform, and we now have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to overhaul it. We all want an economy that reaches for its full potential again. We all want to support small businesses and the middle class. Tax reform represents the single most important action we can take today to advance goals like these.

  • Kentuckians have many contributions in nation’s military

    On Saturday, our nation will pause to pay tribute to those men and women who, for more than two centuries now, have given their time, talents and, if necessary, life and limb to protect us and countless others around the world.

  • Martin Luther meets Jesus

    By MICHAEL JINKINS
    President, Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary
    Martin Luther came to a religious calling via a thunderstorm on a sultry day in 1505. He was then, as the great church historian Roland Bainton has explained, a student of twenty-one years returning to the University of Erfurt following a visit home.

  • Forecast projects state’s General Fund short by $150 million

    They may be unknown to the general public, and their subject matter may be a little dry, but the seven economists who comprise the Consensus Forecasting Group have a powerful role to play: They determine just how much money state government can expect.

  • The Boy Scouts are no more

    By Richard Nelson
    The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) made waves when it announced that it’s accepting girls into its ranks. This latest identity crisis for the 107-year old organization may be the straw that sinks their original mission to train young boys to become men.
    BSA’s Chief Scout Executive Michael Surbaugh cited the need to “evolve how our programs meet the needs of families interested in positive and lifelong experiences for their children.” No mention was made by Scout leadership about how they will fulfill their commitment to boys.

  • Despite educational gains, room remains for improvement

    When taking the long view, Kentucky has covered quite a bit of ground since we overhauled elementary and secondary education in 1990.
    Several years ago, for example, a study out of Harvard University found that only seven states saw their schools make greater progress during the previous two decades. Education Week’s most recent Quality Counts study, meanwhile, ranks Kentucky 16th when focused just on academic achievement.