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Guest Columns

  • Limited discussion on House bills regarding education

    Fifteen minutes – that’s how long the new House Majority let opponents to charter schools discuss a last-minute funding bill that will siphon money from our public schools for years to come.
    It was an 11th-hour sneak attack on March 15th, offered in the final moments of the final day for passing legislation. It was certainly not the first assault on the democratic process during the 2017 session, but it’s the one with the most potential for damaging the future of Kentucky’s school children.

  • Short Senate week is ‘intense’

    A flurry of activity stemming from committee meetings and the passage of bills marked a short but intense Week 6 of the Kentucky General Assembly. Although the Senate was only in session from Monday to Wednesday of this week, committee meetings still met during the later part of the week to give final hearings to a few select bills.

  • General Assembly approaching ‘concurrence’ days

    The 2017 session is coming down to the wire, with major legislation still left to consider on two “concurrence” days next week. After March 15th, we recess until March 29th and 30th, when we reconvene for our final two days to review any gubernatorial vetoes.

  • OVEC and iLEAD Academy school districts breaking new ground again

    Students in Carroll, Gallatin, Henry, Owen and Trimble counties will get a jumpstart on Ky’s highest demand health care careers

    The Ohio Valley Educational Cooperative (OVEC) and five of its member school districts collaborating to operate iLEAD Academy, Kentucky’s first regional high school, are breaking new ground again. 

  • State Senate passes 40 pieces of legislation in week

    Late nights, packed committee meetings, and heated debate marked the fifth week of the 2017 Session. The Senate is quickly passing the remaining Senate bills out and receiving bills from the House for consideration. While there were some contested issues, the Senate conducted itself in a bipartisan fashion. We wasted no time this week and passed over 40 pieces of legislation including:
    · Senate Bill 9, redistricting of judicial districts in order to better align caseloads with current census data;

  • Rand blasts House majority for rush in passing measures

    Through a series of extreme parliamentary maneuvers that kept teachers and other interested Kentuckians from effectively voicing their concerns, the House Majority forced a vote on the “charter schools” bill Friday in an early morning committee meeting, before rushing the measure to the House floor where it passed on a 56-39 vote.

  • School leadership teams developing innovative schedule for student needs

    Dear Readers,
    Recently our district middle and high school leadership teams have been meeting to create an innovative school schedule that will better meet the needs of our students and more effectively utilize our limited resources. Somehow this has turned into a belief that the district is going to do away with Honors classes at the high school.

  • Senate has busy week

    Visits from advocacy groups, a ceremonial bill signing, and rallies in the Capitol Rotunda, along with the bipartisan passage of bills, marked a busy Week Four of the 2017 Legislative Session. We were excited to welcome the children of Kentucky National Guard members from across the state for the First Annual Kentucky Military Kids Day. It was an honor to host these families who have sacrificed so much to serve our state and our country.

  • General Assembly halfway finished

    We passed the half-way point of our 30-day session this week and accrued some historic stats along the way.
    A combined total of 793 bills were filed in the House and Senate this year. That’s the second-highest amount for an odd-year regular session and just two bills shy of the 795 bills filed in 2007.

  • Rand provides review of the week in General Assembly

    Democracy in action is often a crowded affair, as the waiting rooms and hallways of the Capitol and Capitol Annex overflowed this week with large groups of Kentuckians traveling to Frankfort to make their voices heard on key issues important to their cause.
    Librarians, social workers, physician assistants, county magistrates, steel workers, and representatives from United Way and the American Cancer Society were among those individuals who scheduled appointments with each of us to advocate on behalf of their local organizations.