.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Guest Columns

  • Senate passes several priority pieces of legislation

    Week four of the Kentucky General Assembly marked a momentous occasion for our state. Governor Matt Bevin gave his first State of the Commonwealth Budget Address, laying out a plan that will guide Kentucky out of the financial mire that has lingered for the past eight years.

  • Miracle addresses criticism

    Dear Readers,

  • Are attitudes changing toward abortion issue?

    By Rick Nelson
    Last week started out with many commemorating the work of Dr.  Martin Luther King Jr.  It ended Friday with people marching and assembling in cities (not hit by the wintery blast) to uphold human dignity of a different kind. While King was the face of the civil rights movement, it is unlikely the pro-life movement will ever have a single representative, but if they do, it will probably be the face of an anonymous woman who’s had an abortion.

  • Stepping towards grace

    Since my friend Mike has been sober, he’s taken me to one of his AA meetings every so often.
    I don’t struggle with alcohol, but I have my own compulsions and obsessions.
    It’s my opinion that every one of us is addicted to something and that those somethings can and do change, sometimes daily.

  • Senate’s short week ‘significant’

    Although week three of the General Assembly was short due to the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday and the inclement weather Friday, the Kentucky Senate passed significant bills and welcomed visitors who braved the snow in Frankfort.
    On Tuesday we passed two of our priority bills: Senate Bill (SB) 4 and SB 10. SB 4 would require those seeking an abortion to have a face-to-face, in-person counseling session with a physician 24 hours prior to the procedure. This effort to promote the rights of the unborn passed with bipartisan support.

  • Several bills move forward despite short work week

    With the General Assembly off on Monday for the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday and on Friday because of the snow, last week was an especially short one for legislators.
    A reduced schedule didn’t keep the House from moving several bills forward, however.
    On Wednesday, for example, the chamber’s Judiciary Committee put its support behind House Bill 229, which would give the Attorney General’s office jurisdiction to pursue and prosecute human trafficking cases. 

  • Prayer week or prayer weak

    As I write this, I’m sitting in the sanctuary of my church.
    It’s early on a Monday morning, the first day of our prayer week.
    We did this last year, opened the church to anyone who wanted to come and pray. Last year I went every day and prayed fervent, specific prayers, prayed with all my heart, soul, mind and strength.
    As far as I can tell, not one of my prayers was answered the way I had hoped. The situation I had prayed about has changed, but not the way I had imagined and hoped it would.

  • Congress faces deadline to fund government

    Will December 11th mark another déjà vu moment for Congress?  This looming deadline is the day by which Congress must once again fund the federal government for the upcoming fiscal year.

  • General Assembly’s interim period winding down

    With Thanksgiving behind us and Christmas and New Year’s Eve fast approaching, the General Assembly is winding down what it calls the interim and is preparing for the 2016 legislative session, which will start on Jan. 5th and last for 60 working days.
    Although it is impossible to predict what ultimately will become law, we are getting a clearer idea of the major topics that will be debated.

  • Embracing change

    Dear readers,
    I want to continue last week’s theme on change by completing the list of reasons why people resist change. This is an important theme for us as we move forward to improve our schools as improvement is “change” for the better. Last week I listed two reasons that people resist change which were loss of control, and excess uncertainty. This week I wish to complete the list. The remaining reasons people resist change are: