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Guest Columns

  • Farming remains Kentucky’s strong suit

    Although the economy has weathered some of its toughest years since the Great Depression, there has been one bright spot for Kentucky: Agriculture.
    The new year, in fact, may just bring a new record with it.
    If all goes well, farm receipts could top $5 billion in 2011, or a billion dollars more than just several years ago.

  • Senate sets agenda for 2011 short 
legislative session

    The Senate Majority gathered Dec. 9-10 to discuss the upcoming session and lay out legislative priorities. The short session is just 30 days long, so we have to make the most of it and respond to the issues we heard from voters in the fall.
    What I heard was a resounding rejection of government overreach. People demand transparent government that is efficient and fosters job growth. So, the Senate Majority announced an “Agenda for Prosperity” that tackles these and other issues.

  • Davis: Available 
to constituents via Internet, telephone

    As your representative in Congress, it is my job to represent your voice in Washington and support legislative initiatives that will strengthen our communities.
    In addition to this work, there are many other ways that I can help 4th District residents with issues related to the federal government.  One of the most important responsibilities I have is to help constituents with problems they may encounter with federal government agencies.  

  • Kentucky’s fourth Constitution stands test of time

    Kentucky officially broke away from Virginia in 1792 to become the 15th state to join the Union. The first order of business was to do what the country, itself, had done just several years earlier: Write a Constitution.
    It was in Danville, not Frankfort, where the state’s leaders gathered to write that first foundation of our state govern-ment. Kentucky replaced that document twice in the next 90 years. In 1891, the current and fourth Consititution was approved by voters.

  • New laws seek more oversight of quasi-government agencies

    When we think of state and local governments, it is certainly understandable that much of our focus is on elected offices.
    They are the ones, after all, that ultimately decide the direction the Commonwealth takes.
    But that should not underscore the critical importance of literally hundreds of quasi-government boards and agencies that range from the large – like the Kentucky Lottery Corporation – to such smaller ones as water, fire and library districts. They, too, touch our daily lives, often in ways we may not even realize.

  • HARMONIZING HEALTH

    I had a client named Bill who was caught in the belief that men are not supposed to cry, and that emotions are for women only. He had become a victim of his own rigid view of life and of his fear of feeling anything.
    He told me he had a concern of losing control if his feelings started coming up, so he used his thoughts to push them back down. In his holistic health consultations, we started a process to release his longtime repressed feelings and improve his distorted concept of what was required of him to be considered a “man.”

  • Take ‘Reel Action’ against underage drinking

    I have a story to tell you. If you’re a parent, this could be tough reading; but, it’s necessary reading.
    If you’re a teenager, chances are you’ve heard a similar tale somewhere along the line.
    Either way, it will affect you. My hope is that it moves you to take some action – some “REEL” Action.

  • Humans can't follow rules, which is why God gave us 10

    I’m a recovering helicopter parent, having spent countless hours and huge amounts of energy hovering over my kids, trying to turn them into mini versions of myself.
    Unfortunately, or maybe fortunately, neither daughter is exactly like me, although they have both inherited the need for a “Do not touch” linen closet — shelves of carefully arranged towels and linens that are not to be touched. Ever.

  • Always handle firearms with care

    Fall brings with it hunting season, and Trimble County residents are urged to follow these gun-safety tips to prevent accidents at home or out in the field.

    Store ammunition and firearms in separate, locked cabinets or in closets that are inaccessible to children.

    Never store a firearm that is loaded. It is best to store it with the action open, or taken down when possible.

    Always handle a firearm as if it were loaded, but always check to see if it is loaded when handling it.