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Guest Columns

  • Kentucky’s postsecondary report card is good

    With summer vacation now in full swing, the last thing students may want to think about is school. But that shouldn’t stop the rest of us, because, overall, the report card is pretty good.

    Consider the number of students who secured a degree or certificate from Kentucky’s colleges and universities this past year. There were nearly 63,000 altogether, according to the Council on Postsecondary Education, an 11 percent increase when compared to 2009-10.

  • Memorial Day offers opportunity to recall America’s sacrifices

    EDITOR’S NOTE: The following address was delivered during Monday’s  Community Memorial Day ceremonies at the Trimble County Courthouse by the Rev. Tom Starks, Pastor of Milton Baptist Church. Rev. Starks served in the United States Coast Guard from 1992-1996.

  • Economy showing signs of rebound

    It’s still early, but there are growing signs that the country’s economy is getting back on its feet, and that Kentucky is poised to help lead the way.

  • Kentucky’s tourism industry is big business

    When Kentucky first got into the tourism business, James Monroe was on track to become the country’s fifth president, Daniel Boone was still alive and a 7-year-old boy named Abraham Lincoln was preparing to move from here to Indiana with his family.

  • Mindfulness to change your brain

    I want to tell you an interesting story about a client named Belinda. She came to me because she was having trouble with organizational skills. She said her brain felt scattered and she had trouble focusing on one thought or one task. I told her about a technique called Mindfulness that is being practiced in over 200 hospitals around the United States. The scientific studies showed that the practice of Mindfulness is a form of meditation that not only organizes mental function, but it lowers blood pressure , diminishes the risk of stroke and reduces stress and chronic pain.

  • Celebrate the abundance in the lives of friends

    The condition has a name: Facebook Envy.

    It’s symptoms include twinges of resentment, pangs of self-pity and thoughts of “Why not me?”
    Some blame it on technology itself, although the condition has been around since B.C. — Before Computers.

    For those not familiar with Facebook, it’s a Website where friends, which can be people you actually know or people you might sort of know, post news or random thoughts or pithy messages for their friends and sometimes the general cyber public to read.

  • Happy Mother’s Day!

    Last month my youngest daughter asked if I would write a letter of recommendation for her.

    She had applied for a scholarship geared toward young women on their own who are working on making a better life for themselves. My daughter has been putting herself through school for about six years now.

    When she asked, she had me at “Hi Mom. I need a favor.”

    Unfortunately, according to the letter guidelines, as her mom I’m not eligible to write a letter of recommendation.

    Moms don’t count.

  • Alcohol-related fatalities decline

    One of the country’s great success stories over the last several decades has been its ability to reduce the devastation caused by drunken driving.

    The number of alcohol-related fatalities has dropped by about half since 1982, even though we are driving far more miles now.  That positive trend is even better for our younger drivers.

  • Wrapup of Senate session

    As with much of life, the 2011 General Assembly Session had its share of successes and disappointments. We made advances in economic development, education, and healthcare and definitely raised the debate on what is the appropriate conservative use of the tax dollar and did our best to sound the alarm about what happens when the bill finally comes due.

  • Census statistics show Kentuckians number 4.34 million

    About a year after George Washington was elected President, Congress decided that one of the country’s first orders of business was finding out just how many lived here.