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Guest Columns

  • Adult education sees enrollment growth

    It has been a little more than a decade ago since the General Assembly revamped the state’s adult education programs, a high point in the legislature’s ongoing efforts to improve the classroom from preschool to the workplace.

    While a lot of work remains, the past decade has been exactly what we had hoped. In fact, from 2005 to 2009, adult education enrollment grew by 30 percent – faster than any other state over the same period. There are now about 40,000 citizens who are helped academically each year.

  • Thoughts on coming home to Jesus

    A while ago someone sent me a newsletter from The Coming Home Network International.

    Attached was a note that read: “Mrs. Kennedy, I understand you are a lapsed Catholic. If so, you may find this (newsletter) of interest. Why not return to our Mother Church?”

    It was signed, “a friend.”

  • State ends fiscal year with surprise surplus balance

    There have been several positive signs in recent months that the worst of the recession may finally be behind us, but perhaps the best indication yet for Kentucky came late last week. That’s when Governor Beshear announced that state government ended the just-completed fiscal year with nearly $157 million more than expected.

  • Controlling thoughts leads to inner peace

    Betty came to me for consultation to find peace in her life. She described several situations of chaos and disruption. She has two daughters who had difficult relationships and a father who was very ill.

    Stress at work was a constant threat of cutbacks. Her workload had increased because of the last cutback, which left her department understaffed. She was working longer hours with higher quotas.
    She was worried about the erratic weather and growing violence around the world.

  • Summer education programs

    For many students, the end of the school year does not mean an end to time spent with a teacher.

    In fact, hundreds work as hard during summer vacation as they do during the rest of the year.  Two of the most popular programs Kentucky offers are Governor’s Scholars and the Governor’s School for the Arts, both of which give select high school students a chance to spend several weeks on a college campus with others as driven as they are.

  • Earthquakes: Imagine the unthinkable

    By JONATHON BALL
    Special to The Trimble Banner

    Are you prepared? Very seldom we overlook the unexpected things in life, such as Mother Nature. Mother Nature can cause all kinds of damage not only to property but also human lives. By being prepared and knowing the correct steps to take, this in turn could save your life.

  • Kentucky at the heart of the nation

    One of the Commonwealth’s most famous authors, Jesse Stuart, once wrote that “if these United States can be called a body, Kentucky can be called its heart.”

    He was referring to more than just our location, of course, but his words have proven prophetic in a geographic sense as well.  It turns out that our literal place in the world is a great place to be when it comes to helping the world get what it needs.

  • Prayer lessons from a mud dauber

    The other day I walked into my house and found an intruder.

    He looked mean, too.

    My husband calls creatures like him mud daubers. They’re a type of wasp, with stingers poised to pierce delicate skin such as mine.

    The intruder didn’t seem fazed that he was somewhere he didn’t belong and just buzzed around, probably plotting an attack on my bare arms.

  • General Assembly worked to improve Medicaid savings

    One of the General Assembly’s top priorities this year – fixing a short-term deficit in Medicaid while putting the program on a path toward long-term savings – took a major, even historic, step forward last Thursday.

    That morning, Governor Beshear announced three companies had been hired to manage the care of most of those enrolled in Medicaid. These companies are joining Passport, a state-created entity that has already been doing the same type of work in Jefferson and 15 surrounding counties for more than a decade.

  • Older citizens subject of recent legislation

    One of the country’s biggest challenges over the next few decades is ensuring that the “golden years” truly live up to their name for our older citizens.

    As more Baby Boomers begin turning 65 – the first began celebrating that milestone birthday in January – this group of citizens promises to be a fastest-growing demographic for quite some time.