Guest Columns


    By REP. GREG STUMBO, Speaker
    Kentucky House of Representatives
    When it comes to solving the big issues of the day, President Eisenhower had it right when he said, “If you can’t solve a problem, enlarge it.”

  • October is time for energy awareness in commonwealth

    In a month where we often turn on the air conditioning during the day but the heat at night, it seems appropriate that October has been set aside nationally to raise awareness of our energy needs.
    This annual designation began nearly a quarter-century ago and gives us an opportunity to especially highlight renewable fuels and energy conservation, twin areas where Kentucky routinely gets high marks.

  • Superintendent’s Corner

    Dear Readers,
    When applying for the position of Trimble County superintendent, I was very pleased when doing my research, I found the following as the district’s mission and vision statement:
    Our Mission:
    It’s About Every Student, Every Day… No Excuses
    Our Vision:
    The Trimble County School District will develop graduates who are College and Career Ready.
    Our Belief Statements:
    This We believe….
    -A student’s success is the responsibility of students, teachers, parents, and community.

  • ‘Bless me, Father, for I have sinned’

    Several times a week I pass a church that has a sign board out front advertising confessions on Saturdays.
    I confess that when I was a kid I went to a church that had confession booths, only I thought behind the dark wooden doors was either a broom closet or it was where they kept the devil.
    Kids think crazy things, don’t they?
    When I was 7 or so I got to go behind the wooden doors and confess my sins, which mostly consisted of being mean to my sister and brothers and disobeying my parents.

  • Traffic fatalities on the uptick in state, nation

    For nearly a decade now, Kentucky has made significant progress when it comes to reducing the number of traffic fatalities in the state. Totals that topped 900 annually between 2002 and 2006 dropped to 638 in 2013, a number not seen since the late 1940s. 
    That downward trend, unfortunately, has begun to move in the other direction. Last year’s total was 34 higher than 2013’s, and through the first week of this month, we’re 58 ahead of the same point 12 months ago.

  • The conditions must be right

    “In agriculture, you don’t make plants grow, you create conditions for growth. Manufacturing focuses on the yield. Successful farmers focus on the soil. Plants grow themselves.”
    ----Sir Ken Robinson

  • Crouching kitties at the door

    For the past few months we’ve been taking care of our youngest daughter’s two cats, Mohawk and Target, while our daughter spends some time with my sister in California.
    They’re both gray tabby cats, each about 10 years old.
    My husband calls Mohawk “Hawkeye” or “Hawk” and I’ve nicknamed Target “the weasel” because he’s long and he slinks through the house like I imagine a weasel would.
    Lately, we’ve noticed another cat hanging around, white with butterscotch coloring.

  • Electronic voter registration

    Last week I made the historic announcement that all eligible Kentuckians will soon be able to register to vote online. I am proud to lead the charge to bring voter registration in Kentucky into the 21st Century.

  • Aviation industry big in Kentucky

    Most Kentuckians know that the commonwealth plays a major role in the auto industry – in fact, only two states produce more cars and trucks than we do – but far fewer are likely aware that our work in aerospace and aviation has overtaken it.
    Last year, that industry accounted for nearly $8 billion in exports, topping the $5.9 billion generated by our auto parts and assembly factories. Overall, about half of everything that Kentucky ships beyond our borders ultimately goes toward moving people and products over the ground and in the air.

  • Free/reduced lunch and Title I

    This week I would like to take the time to express to our parents and community the importance of the free and reduced (F/R) lunch program that exists in our schools. This a vital program in so many ways but I feel the numbers for Trimble County are inaccurately reported due to applications not being filed. I hope that knowing how F/R lunch rates impact students and schools we will begin to see more parents taking the time apply for the program.