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Guest Columns

  • Kentucky statistics compare well with sister states

    Kentucky received some welcome news last month when a national study found that no state had a smaller gap when comparing the high school graduation rates of students from low- and higher-income families.
    The average gap across the country stands at 15 percent, but it’s just one percent here in the commonwealth. In fact, our low-income students graduate at a higher rate than the overall national average, something only five other states can say.

  • Trimble County High School cafeteria roof
  • Tax myths addressed

    Dear Readers,
    It is likely that moving forward over the next couple of months I will spend a lot of time writing about the Nickel Tax that is now set for election. I feel that it is important to use every opportunity available to me to assure that true facts are being released to the community. In a previous article I stated that it is the responsibility of every voter to know the facts on both sides of every issue. I hope to help with that process as much as possible.

  • Graying population presents opportunities, challenges alike

    It’s still a while down the road, but the year 2033 will be a pivotal one for our country, because that’s when U.S. Census Bureau projects there will be more citizens over the age of 65 than under the age of 18.
    It’s not a surprising trend, of course, given the gains we have made in medicine, technology and a greater focus on eating right and exercising. From a historical perspective, however, it’s a relatively new phenomenon. A century ago, less than five percent of our citizens were older than 65; by 2040, they will comprise 20 percent. 

  • Kentucky enjoys numerous iconic connections

    When it comes to being home to icons known around the world, few states can compete with Kentucky.
    We have a derby that owns the first Saturday in May; a chicken restaurant chain that has grown from a single location in Corbin to more than 15,000 in 125 nations; and a cave so mammoth that it is longer than the combined lengths of the second- and third-longest on the record books. The six million-plus barrels of bourbon now resting in our warehouses, meanwhile, represent more than 90 percent of the world’s production.

  • Community support sought for nickel tax

    Dear Readers,

  • Kentucky home to summer academic opportunities

    Some of Kentucky’s most successful academic programs take place, oddly enough, when the school year is over.
    Several of these got their start in the 1980s, and they have since given thousands of our brightest middle and high school students a chance to come together in a college setting and learn in ways that often extend beyond the traditional classroom.
    The Governor’s Scholars Program (GSP) is perhaps the most well-known of these. It began in 1983 and now serves more than 1,100 students each summer over several campuses across the commonwealth.

  • New fiscal year begins with new laws taking effect

    The halls of the Capitol may be relatively quiet when July arrives, but that doesn’t detract from the month’s importance when it comes to running state government. It marks the start of another fiscal year and, in even-numbered years, is when most new state laws take effect.

  • SLC enables states to learn from each other’s successes

    States have often been called laboratories of democracy, and for good reason: That’s where most cutting-edge ideas to improve government are first tested. The good ones are widely copied while the unworkable ones teach a valuable lesson as well.

  • Churches encouraged to fill the pews with shoes for local students July 10

    Do you remember the week or so before school when you were not ready for school to begin, but were excited to see your friends from across the county?
    Would I get the teachers and classes I wanted? Thoughts in my head were of what I would do with my hair, which dress would give that grown up look for my new year? Which pair of shoes would I wear?
    What about our youth that are dreading the school experience because they do not have any shoes to wear? What will the others think of the holes and the taped up soles are the questions on their minds.