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Guest Columns

  • Dead man rising

    About six or so years ago, I met a man who said he saw a dead man raised to life.

    The dead man’s name was Bob and the man who told me about it said God had told him to go to Bob’s house to pray.

    He didn’t know Bob had died until he got there, but since God had told him to pray, he figured he better do it. So, he asked Bob’s wife if he could see him.

    The man had seen death before, and Bob was dead. Even so, the man started praying because God had told him so.

  • What type of parent are you?

    By Deanna Felts  
    Special to The Trimble Banner

    Recently my husband was speaking with another parent with kids older than ours.  Eventually, they got around to discussing parenting. Not a controversial subject - at least that’s what my husband thought.  It turns out they were both surprised when they discovered each held such differing views on the topic of parental involvement.  What are your thoughts on parent involvement?  Is that a loaded question? Maybe it leads to lots more questions. Let’s see.

  • Where is God?

    Every time my town has an event that draws a lot of people, from a Saturday’s farmer’s market to a festival or parade, a local pastor and members of his church are there, handing out gospel tracts.
    During the St. Patrick’s Day parade, Brother Troy was on the corner, handing out tracts.

    The one he gave me had an I.Q. test on the front with only one question. “GODISNOWHERE — What does this say?”

    People either see “God is nowhere” or “God is now here.”

  • The week in the Kentucky Senate

    While we passed several important bills this week, my time was dominated with review of the House’s proposal, House Bill 265, for the state’s two-year budget. The plan will be roughly $9 billion per year or $18 billion total. In that, the Senate proposal carries about 6.58 percent authorized debt which is lower than the House’s proposal of 6.8 percent and even lower than the Governor’s proposal of 7.1 percent.

  • This week in the Kentucky House

    In one key way, legislative sessions are a lot like March Madness: The intensity picks up as the number of days winds down.  That makes this week, then, the General Assembly’s version of the Final Four.

  • Senate week in review

    We are entering the home stretch of the 2012 General Assembly with the attendant rush of bills as legislators feel the urgency of the dwindling days. The Senate had a very full week with legislation, committee meetings, and we received the budget proposal from the House as well as the state’s road plan. Visits from groups ranging from the AARP to 4H also came to the capitol to see their legislator and press for their causes.

  • House week in review

    Most legislation that the General Assembly passes each year falls in one of two categories: It either protects, or it promotes.

    That was especially evident this past week in the Kentucky House of Representatives, which voted for bills that range from further limiting abuse of our youngest and oldest citizens to helping more students in the coalfields of Eastern Kentucky get their four-year college degree.

  • Scarred for life

    All this past week I’ve been talking to people with scars for a series of stories that I wrote for the newspaper where I work.

    I got the idea from a photographer I heard on the radio, talking about a series of photos he had done of people’s scars.

    He said that every scar tells a story.

  • Comer: Help is available for farmers hit by March 2 storms

    I was heartbroken to hear of the loss of life and property from the storms that ripped through parts of Kentucky on March 2. To those of you who were affected, my family and I hold you in our thoughts and prayers.

    Many of you lost your homes, your businesses, your vehicles, and other property in the storms. You are frustrated, and you just want to get back to some sense of normalcy. Neither I nor anyone else can make the pain of loss go away. But there are sources of aid to help you in this difficult time.

  • House passes budget, education, others spared

    For the last several years, the biggest challenge facing the General Assembly and Governor Beshear has been keeping the state on track as it weathers the toughest worldwide recession in more than 70 years.