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Guest Columns

  • Senate stalls road plan forcing special session this week

    When the General Assembly wrapped up much of its work at the end of last month, there was only one day left in this year’s legislative session.

    Traditionally, this time is spent just considering any vetoes the governor might issue on the bills making it through the House and Senate. This year, however, there was still some unfinished business that had to be addressed, with the most pressing being the state’s road plan and a budget for the Transportation Cabinet. The agenda also included a major initiative to curb prescription drug abuse.

  • Senate stalls road plan forcing special session this week

    When the General Assembly wrapped up much of its work at the end of last month, there was only one day left in this year’s legislative session.

    Traditionally, this time is spent just considering any vetoes the governor might issue on the bills making it through the House and Senate. This year, however, there was still some unfinished business that had to be addressed, with the most pressing being the state’s road plan and a budget for the Transportation Cabinet. The agenda also included a major initiative to curb prescription drug abuse.

  • Rep. Rand reviews the week in the House

    During even-year legislative sessions, no other bill gets more attention than the budget, which is understandable, because no other bill directs so many of the General Assembly’s priorities.

    Even so, that doesn’t undercut the importance of other legislation also set to become law, and as my colleagues and I prepare to wrap up the 2012 Regular Session this coming Thursday, there are more than a few of these bills that deserve mention.

  • Rand’s House update

    When House and Senate leaders first sat down early last week in budget negotiations, most of the major issues had already been decided.

    Each chamber, for example, supported Governor Beshear’s decision to cut most state agencies by more than eight percent next fiscal year to balance the books and then maintain that level of spending in the following year.  Both the House and Senate feel it is important to live within our means, and to rely as little as possible on one-time funding sources to cover recurring expenses.

  • Harris’ Senate update

    By the time you read this, the 2012 General Assembly will be one day away from concluding. We have completed 59 days of the 60 day session, the last day, April 12, is reserved for considering any Governor’s vetoes, if any.

    By far, working on the state’s two-year budget was the most pressing issue this week. After several late nights, we reached consensus on the $19.4 billion budget with the House negotiators a little before 3am on Thursday. It was a hard-fought point but for the first time in recent memory, Kentucky will not bond for current expenses.

  • Dead man rising

    About six or so years ago, I met a man who said he saw a dead man raised to life.

    The dead man’s name was Bob and the man who told me about it said God had told him to go to Bob’s house to pray.

    He didn’t know Bob had died until he got there, but since God had told him to pray, he figured he better do it. So, he asked Bob’s wife if he could see him.

    The man had seen death before, and Bob was dead. Even so, the man started praying because God had told him so.

  • What type of parent are you?

    By Deanna Felts  
    Special to The Trimble Banner

    Recently my husband was speaking with another parent with kids older than ours.  Eventually, they got around to discussing parenting. Not a controversial subject - at least that’s what my husband thought.  It turns out they were both surprised when they discovered each held such differing views on the topic of parental involvement.  What are your thoughts on parent involvement?  Is that a loaded question? Maybe it leads to lots more questions. Let’s see.

  • Where is God?

    Every time my town has an event that draws a lot of people, from a Saturday’s farmer’s market to a festival or parade, a local pastor and members of his church are there, handing out gospel tracts.
    During the St. Patrick’s Day parade, Brother Troy was on the corner, handing out tracts.

    The one he gave me had an I.Q. test on the front with only one question. “GODISNOWHERE — What does this say?”

    People either see “God is nowhere” or “God is now here.”

  • The week in the Kentucky Senate

    While we passed several important bills this week, my time was dominated with review of the House’s proposal, House Bill 265, for the state’s two-year budget. The plan will be roughly $9 billion per year or $18 billion total. In that, the Senate proposal carries about 6.58 percent authorized debt which is lower than the House’s proposal of 6.8 percent and even lower than the Governor’s proposal of 7.1 percent.

  • This week in the Kentucky House

    In one key way, legislative sessions are a lot like March Madness: The intensity picks up as the number of days winds down.  That makes this week, then, the General Assembly’s version of the Final Four.