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Guest Columns

  • Attitudes to accomplish your goals

  • Tortures of travel time

    When it comes to traveling, my oldest daughter thinks she’s cursed.

    I don’t know about “cursed,” but she definitely has had her share of mishaps.

    Last summer she and granddaughter Caroline took a trip from their home in Virginia to visit my other daughter in Charlotte, N.C.

    The three of them went to Charleston, S.C. and Caroline barfed, which put a damper on their plans. Then Caroline stayed sick, ending Alison’s plans for a side trip to visit a friend on the way home.

  • Energy production, use high in Kentucky; research ongoing

    When it comes to energy, it could be said that Kentucky burns the candle from both ends. That’s because only four states produce more power than we do, and only seven use more per person.

    That’s not surprising, of course, since Kentucky plays prominent roles nationally in coal production as well as manufacturing, especially in the auto and aluminum industries.

  • Hospital care gets high marks in Ky.

    If today turns out to be an average one for Kentucky’s hospitals, here is a glimpse of what is taking place: More than 6,600 patients will be treated in emergency rooms; 14,000 more will be helped with other outpatient services; 1,500 will be discharged after a stay of about four-and-a-half days; and 150 of the state’s newest citizens will be born.

  • Crosses of Mercy

    They’re called Crosses of Mercy, three tall crosses - two pale blue and one gold - planted across at least 29 states and Washington, D.C., plus Zambia and the Philippines.

    Where I live in Florida, I’ve seen several sets of them and I’ve always wondered about them since they don’t seem to be connected to any one church. They’re usually out in the middle of nowhere, randomly planted on the highway.

  • Kentucky gets high marks for highway system

    For most of Kentucky’s history, there were only two ways to get from one place to another: By horse or by boat. Even when railroads began reaching across the state in the 1830s, these methods of travel remained the backbone of our early transportation system.

    While rivers were essentially open to anyone, the same could not be said of our first roads, almost all of which were privately owned even well past the Civil War. Those wanting to use them could expect to pay a hefty price, too, since toll gates were built about five miles apart on average.

  • Knowing who I am

    In my family we have this thing we say about our mom dropping us on our heads as babies.

    Not that she ever did - that I’m aware of - although she has admitted to tossing my oldest brother over her shoulder accidentally a bit too vigorously, catching him by his foot before he could crash to the floor.

    No harm, no foul, as they say.

  • Holiday is a day to remember sacrifices

    With most schools already out for the year and the sun not setting until well into the evening, it’s understandable if many look to the upcoming three-day holiday weekend as the unofficial start of summer.

    Memorial Day is about much more than that, though.

    For nearly 150 years now, it has been a day of remembrance, a day to recall the sacrifice that so many gave for our nation.

  • Bad week, good news

    The other day a co-worker posted on Facebook that it had been the week from hell.

    We had all felt it. It was as if a black cloud hovered over us, raining down all kinds of bad.
    We had made mistakes. Tempers flared. Fingers pointed.

    Cranky people called, which didn’t help our own crankiness.

    We scowled. We skulked. We wished we were anywhere but here.

    It was one b-a-d week.

  • Tourism plays major role in Kentucky’s economy

    When it comes to tourism, Kentucky has not one but two major factors in its favor: We have dozens of destinations that all but sell themselves, and we’re home to the nation’s population center east of the Rockies, meaning no state is closer to more Americans.