Guest Columns

  • Mumbo jumbo, odds and ends -- and mercy

    Once again it’s time for a mumbo jumbo, bits of odds and ends column filled with random thoughts and various things I’ve found and have been saving that are too short for a full-length column yet too good not to use. I hope there will be something helpful to you.
    * In a sermon at the church in Tampa we often visit, the pastor talked about fear, a subject I am well acquainted with, although I’m much better than I was.

  • High-speed Internet in every Ky. county

    Kentucky is embarking on one of the biggest infrastructure projects in more than 50 years – developing a robust, reliable, fiber “backbone” infrastructure that will bring high-speed Internet connectivity to every county of the Commonwealth.
    The network, called KentuckyWired or the I-Way in eastern Kentucky, will break down geographic and financial barriers to education and economic development by providing affordable, high-quality Internet service to connect Kentuckians to the world.

  • Constitution Day: Celebrate civic history

    It may not be celebrated as much as Independence Day, but Constitution Day is arguably just as important. While July 4th recognizes the birth of our nation, Sept. 17th commemorates the day we established the cornerstone of our government and secured our rights as citizens.
    In the 228 years since that journey began, the U.S. Constitution has become the oldest charter among the world’s major countries and still remains, at 4,400 words, the shortest.

  • They will know we are Christians by our love

    This past week at church we sang the song, “They’ll Know We Are Christians By Our Love,” which made me smile.
    Written by a Catholic priest in 1968, I knew the song from my childhood. I have a vivid memory of my little brother singing it -- while beating the tar out of my other brother.
    I’m sure neither of my brothers appreciated the irony.

  • Fall festival season is in full swing in the Bluegrass

    While the temperature outside may not feel like fall just yet, many of the traditional signs of the season are starting to arrive.
    One of the most telling is the sheer number of festivals that has already started to take place and will run through Halloween. They are centered on items you might expect – tobacco, apples and bourbon – and a few more that may seem odd until their history is known.

  • The ‘tocayo’ of Christ

    In my family we have two new babies: Lily Aaron and Zachary Jack.
    Lily is my niece Jennifer’s third daughter and Zach is my nephew Shane’s third son. Both babies were born just a few weeks apart, Lily in July and Zachary in August. My sister now has six grandchildren.
    If Lily had been a boy she would be Jack Aaron.
    Jack is my dad’s name. Aaron is Lily’s dad Marc’s middle name.
    Got all that?

  • Kentucky boasts women pioneers in many professions

    Last week, the United States celebrated the 95th anniversary of women’s right to vote, a milestone made possible by the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.
    Kentucky was the 23rd state to ratify that amendment, but it did not clear its final legislative hurdle until Tennessee became the 36th in Aug. 1920. Interestingly, that decision was a close one, occurring only when a young legislator voted in favor at the request of his mother.

  • Choo-choo choosing to unhitch from the crazy train

    Just this morning my friend Tara and I were wondering if it’s possible to be addicted to drama.
    She calls it being on the crazy train. She said when the crazy train comes around and she hitches a ride on it she’s firing on all cylinders, she’s in high gear and overdrive, not to mention mixing metaphors.
    She feels alive, she says, yet at the same time she hates it with all her might.

  • Standing up for rural postal delivery

    By Marie Powell
    Center for Rural Affairs    
    Post offices are crucial anywhere, but especially crucial in rural areas that depend on the postal service to stay connected through news delivery, services crucial to businesses, and, in some communities, a link to prescription drugs and other services.
    The mail service is a national treasure that has been in operation for 240 years. Every day, the Postal Service provides affordable, universal mail service to all—without using taxpayer dollars for its operation.

  • Legislators working to ensure veterans receive benefits

    One of the ongoing challenges our country faces is making sure our veterans receive the full benefits they have rightfully earned.
    Unfortunately, as we discovered during a legislative meeting earlier this month, there are still some who are either unaware of what is available or who have become mired in bureaucracy. The good news is that, thanks to the Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs (KDVA), we are making great strides in closing these twin gaps.