Guest Columns

  • Kentucky’s online portals provide helpful info

    One of the country’s most enduring challenges is making sure that our citizens, both young and old alike, have at least a basic understanding of government and the role we all play in making it work.

  • Kentucky abundant with fish, wildlife and nature sporting

    For hundreds of thousands of Kentuckians and out-of-state visitors, there is no place quite like the commonwealth when it comes to hunting, fishing or just experiencing all that nature has to offer.
    In a given year, more than 550,000 people fish, 347,000 hunt and another two million either boat on our rivers and lakes or observe our wildlife. Not surprisingly, these outdoor activities are a major driver of our economy, with the Kentucky Department of Fish & Wildlife Resources estimating the annual impact at nearly $6 billion.

  • Athletic complex expenditures addressed

    Dear Readers,
    As we continue to get closer to Election Day I continue to hear of certain questions or statements that are made concerning the nickel tax. It has been my goal with my weekly article to provide as much factual information as possible and clear up misconceptions as I hear them. Please understand that there have been valid questions and concerns asked in the past months and I have been happy to have those brought to me. This week is no different. There are two items I would like to address this week.

  • Consider conversion of Trimble LG&E plant to gas

    By Charles R. Liston, Ph.D
     My residence is just above Wise’s Landing, just south of the Trimble generating station.  Thus, though I can view the Plant from our property, the proposed landfill does not directly affect me nearly as much as the unfortunate folks residing very close to this proposed development, and whose property values will no doubt plummet.  Some will no doubt have to move.

  • Rep. Massie: Audit the Federal Reserve

    Congressional committees are jokingly referred to as the place where bills go to die.  However, I’m happy to report that my bipartisan bill to audit the Federal Reserve passed the House Oversight and Government Reform committee by unanimous consent this summer, and is now eligible to come before the full House for a vote.  Since 90 percent of bills die in committee, you could say that my legislation had a near-death experience, but that’s a good thing.

  • Ten Commandments come down

    By Richard Nelson
    After a threatening letter from the Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF), a Trigg County official removed the Ten Commandments from the county Courthouse. All is right with Trigg County’s world now, at least according to FFRF. Or is it?

  • Fall festival season underway across the Commonwealth

    If there is one theme binding the numerous festivals that take place across the commonwealth each year, it’s that if we raise it, grow it or use a lot of it, there’s almost certainly a community that celebrates it.
    Most of these festivals take place over a 10-week period that begins in late August and runs through Halloween, and food is often the focal point. During that time, you can find events dedicated to apples, chicken, country ham, sorghum, bourbon, honey, barbecue and even salt.

  • First Responders Day commemorates sacrifices of 9/11

    On Sunday morning, our nation will pause to remember and reflect upon the tragedy known primarily by its date: 9/11.
    Those of us old enough to remember that Tuesday in 2001 will never forget where we were and what we were doing when we heard the news. It had the same impact as such other pivotal moments in history, from the attack on Pearl Harbor and President Kennedy’s assassination to Neil Armstrong’s walking on the moon.

  • Scenarios envisioned if the school nickel tax vote is successful in Nov.

    Dear Readers,
    In the past week I have continued to hear of questions regarding the Nickel tax and urgent needs funding. It is my goal to answer those questions in this week’s article. The questions asked are:
    •What if the nickel tax does not pass? What are the consequences?
    •What if the tax passes but the legislature does not give Trimble any urgent needs funds?
    •What is the cost to the citizens of Trimble County should the nickel tax pass?
    •Why should renters care?

  • Kentucky should add scholarship tax credits to its back-to-school list

    By Charles H. Leis
    As students across Kentucky begin a new school year, many cannot wait to see their friends and reunite with their favorite teachers. Some are excited to continue learning in the classroom. In some cases, however, students are returning to an education that is not working for them or their families.
    Each student has an education situation unique to themselves. As it stands, our education system leaves some students behind. Our current system can lock students into a school that does not match up with the type of education they want or need.