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Guest Columns

  • Caution: Zika virus remains a national health concern

    Yard signs advertising mosquito control are about as common as shaved iced shacks around Kentucky this summer. And if you’ve been watching the news over the past year, I’m sure you’ve guessed why.

  • Founders’ values still to be treasured

    Over two hundred years ago, our Founding Fathers put their lives on the line to create a new country in which freedom reigned. These men had a vision of a nation unafraid to face its enemies and win. We, the people of the United States, have faced insurmountable odds since our young country’s conception but continue to fight for our God-given rights unique to the United States of America.

  • Don’t miss our local patriotic events

    When our forefathers put their signatures to paper to declare our independence as a nation 241 years ago on July 4, 1776, there was no doubt it was a time to celebrate.
    Public readings of the freshly-written Declaration of Independence were held in Philadelphia’s Independence Square amid bells ringing and bands playing. Bonfires and fireworks were added to the celebration the next year and then the tradition spread, with towns large and small joining in the merriment.

  • General Assembly srives to battle drug epidemic

    Someone abuses drugs every hour in Kentucky. But just how people are addicted to drugs in Kentucky is hard to quantify.
    The reason for that is not every addict seeks treatment, and many die as a result:  A record number of 1,248 people dying from overdoses in 2015 alone, according to the state.

  • Civility is on life support

    By RICHARD NELSON
    Civility is on life support. But the body politic was sick long before James T. Hodgkinson assaulted GOP Congressmen at a baseball practice, critically wounding Con. Steve Scalise and wounding five others after asking whether the men on the field were Republicans or Democrats.

  • Church: Why bother? Here’s why

    These days, a lot of people are in recovery, from drug or alcohol addiction, from childhood trauma and abuse -- the list goes on.
    It’s good that people are seeking help for the things that hurt them.
    But church?
    Over the years I’ve noticed an increasing number of articles and books and blogs written by “recovering” church people, former Christian fundamentalists or evangelicals, former Catholics, former Baptists.

  • Cure for rotting bones

    If it’s true, as the proverb says, that “envy rots the bones,” then my bones are dust.
    Every once in awhile I hear from a certain friend whose life is perfect, or so I think.
    Just recently she posted on Facebook: “Well, we can cross a trip to Ireland off our list!! Had a fabulous vacation with all our wonderful kids, their spouses and our five -- five!! -- adorable grandbabies!!!”

  • Stars and Stripes birthday often unnoticed

    Flag Day commemorates the official adoption of the Stars and Stripes as our national symbol, an action taken by the Second Continental Congress on June 14, 1777.
    Usually this isn’t much of a holiday.  Stores are busy, federal and state offices are open, and the US Postal Service runs the mail. Come June 14 each year, the vast majority of Americans probably have no idea that a holiday is being observed.
    I believe Flag Day deserves better. So let’s pause for just a minute to reflect on why.

  • Community support for schools’ progress appreciated

    Dear Readers,
    I would like to take the time this week to show my gratitude for those in the community who have been supportive of the progress Trimble County Public Schools has made in the past two years. Through the hard work of our staff and the Board of Education we have seen great and positive changes occur that hopefully will build a strong foundation for the future of our district, our schools, our community, and most importantly our students.

  • Brief explanation of firearms legislation

    The Second Amendment is in the news a lot these days. It should be. It’s an important part of our nation’s history.
    The right to bear arms meant self-preservation to colonial Americans who fought off a monarchy to build a democratic republic based on freedom and prosperity. Firearms kept harm at bay and put food on the table. They also allowed the colonies to build a militia in the interest of American independence – a legacy that the organized militia of the state National Guard carries with it today.