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Guest Columns

  • Kentucky enjoys numerous iconic connections

    When it comes to being home to icons known around the world, few states can compete with Kentucky.
    We have a derby that owns the first Saturday in May; a chicken restaurant chain that has grown from a single location in Corbin to more than 15,000 in 125 nations; and a cave so mammoth that it is longer than the combined lengths of the second- and third-longest on the record books. The six million-plus barrels of bourbon now resting in our warehouses, meanwhile, represent more than 90 percent of the world’s production.

  • Community support sought for nickel tax

    Dear Readers,

  • Kentucky home to summer academic opportunities

    Some of Kentucky’s most successful academic programs take place, oddly enough, when the school year is over.
    Several of these got their start in the 1980s, and they have since given thousands of our brightest middle and high school students a chance to come together in a college setting and learn in ways that often extend beyond the traditional classroom.
    The Governor’s Scholars Program (GSP) is perhaps the most well-known of these. It began in 1983 and now serves more than 1,100 students each summer over several campuses across the commonwealth.

  • New fiscal year begins with new laws taking effect

    The halls of the Capitol may be relatively quiet when July arrives, but that doesn’t detract from the month’s importance when it comes to running state government. It marks the start of another fiscal year and, in even-numbered years, is when most new state laws take effect.

  • SLC enables states to learn from each other’s successes

    States have often been called laboratories of democracy, and for good reason: That’s where most cutting-edge ideas to improve government are first tested. The good ones are widely copied while the unworkable ones teach a valuable lesson as well.

  • Churches encouraged to fill the pews with shoes for local students July 10

    Do you remember the week or so before school when you were not ready for school to begin, but were excited to see your friends from across the county?
    Would I get the teachers and classes I wanted? Thoughts in my head were of what I would do with my hair, which dress would give that grown up look for my new year? Which pair of shoes would I wear?
    What about our youth that are dreading the school experience because they do not have any shoes to wear? What will the others think of the holes and the taped up soles are the questions on their minds.

  • Fourth of July and the liberty we fight to preserve

    As it has for nearly two-and-a-half centuries, our nation will pause on Monday to celebrate its “birth” day, commemorating a time 240 years ago when the Founding Fathers declared our independence.

    Since July 4, 1776, we have weathered a war for our freedom, a war against ourselves, and wars against those who would like nothing more than to see us and our values falter. Although the world has changed in countless ways since Thomas Jefferson penned the Declaration of Indepen-dence, our commitment to protect and promote freedom has never wavered.

  • New service offers residents protection from scams

    I wanted to be your Attorney General to build a better, safer state for Kentucky families.
    Unfortunately, too many Kentuckians are calling my office, upset and devastated after being scammed. They need help in recovering thousands of dollars they have sent to a con artist.
    These con artists are persuasive. Anyone can fall for their lies and threats.
    Just recently, a senior citizen in Elizabethtown was defrauded out of more than $50,000 in an Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Scam, from someone claiming to be an IRS agent.

  • Kentucky exports in autos, aerospace continue to grow

    Site Selection is not a magazine most of us would keep on our coffee table, but for those in government and business who track economic development, this publication is one not to be missed.
    Fortunately, it has had a lot of good things to say about Kentucky in recent years, and over the past two, it has awarded us its annual Governor’s Cup for having more major job announcements than any other state on a per capita basis.

  • Kentucky’s obesity rate doubles in past two decades

    To get a better understanding of just how prevalent obesity has become in America, consider that no state had more than 20 percent of its adult population fall in that category in 1996. Today, no state has less.
    Kentucky has seen its rate for adults double during that timeframe, from about 16 percent to more than 32 percent, putting us 12th highest among the 50 states. Unfortunately, the state rankings are worse for our children, with high schoolers leading the nation and those not yet school age ranked sixth.