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Guest Columns

  • House Speaker: ‘right to work wrong for Kentucky’

    Over the last four months, there has unfortunately been a renewed effort to breathe life into a proposal that most economists declared dead long ago. Supporters call it “right to work”; the rest of us, with the facts on our side, call it “right to work for less.”
    Those backing the concept claim it will cure everything but the common cold. Not embracing it, they say, has cost Kentucky countless jobs and limited worker choice.
    They’re wrong on both counts.

  • The joy of being a sinner

    Thanks to my daughter, Alison, I’ve been listening to Chris Rosebrough, a Lutheran pastor in North Dakota who has a daily podcast, “Fighting for the Faith.”
    He critiques sermons by a number of superstar Christian pastors and speakers who have become more enamored with themselves than with Jesus. Among other things, Rosebrough points out how they mangle or water down scripture, or ignore it altogether.

  • Energy a state focus

    Even before it became a state in 1792, Kentucky’s energy potential was well-known.
    It all began in 1750, when Dr. Thomas Walker, one of Kentucky’s early explorers, discovered coal here, and our profile began expanding significantly 40 years later, when the first commercial coal mine opened in what is now Lee County.

  • Death of the dreaded neighbor lady

    I killed my neighbor lady last week.
    I’ve written about her before, about how she’s a huge butinsky when it comes to my kids and how she’s always running interference for them, “protecting” them from the way I parent them and just basically being a major pain in my neck.

  • Lesser known measures also receive the attention of House and Senate

    Each legislative session, the public understandably focuses most of its attention on the biggest issues facing the General Assembly, which this year range from addressing a heroin epidemic to modernizing rules for the telecommunications industry.
    There are always other measures, however, that also deserve recognition because of the positive impact they will have on the state. With the House and Senate returning to the Capitol early this week for the session’s final two days, it is worth noting many of those bills that are set to become law.

  • When God is ‘too small’

    A few years back, I read about a woman who titles her years according to what she wanted to accomplish or see happen during the year.
    One year might be “The year of overcoming” or “Hope will see me through.”
    That one particular year was titled “Your God is too small” after a lengthy conversation she had with a friend about all the things she doubted would ever happen, from family members coming to faith in Christ to whether she would ever or could ever sell her house.

  • Despite weather, General Assembly still on schedule

    After a successful beginning to the week in the Senate, extreme weather conditions on Wednesday evening into Thursday prevented us from holding session on Thursday and Friday. The LRC offices were closed on Thursday, but were re-opened on Friday, so we held a caucus meeting to discuss some remaining issues facing the final days of the 2015 Session.

  • Civil protection orders broadened by HB 8

    While another round of record snow and cold kept the House and Senate from being able to meet for two days last week, both chambers nonetheless finished work on several notable bills and are poised to pass even more in the three days we meet this week.
    Although it has a couple of hurdles still to clear as of this writing, one of the legislative session’s most far-reaching initiatives appears destined to become law.

  • Hope to share

    Although grace is free, hope recently cost me $8 on Etsy, the Website where people sell their handiwork.
    For $8 I bought a wire bracelet that forms the word “hope,” which I’ve been wearing all week.
    Lately, hope has been my thing. I was talking with a tattoo artist for a story I’m working on and told him if I ever got a tattoo it would be the word hope in simple script, lower-case lettering, written very small, with a period at the end. (hope.)

  • Despite weather Senate meets to pass seven bills

    Despite the bitter cold and record-breaking snowfall throughout the Commonwealth, the Senate convened Thursday and Friday to do the people’s work. With the session nearing the halfway point, Thursday and Friday were active days on the Senate floor.
    Bills were heard on the floor that ranged from health care issues, freedom of expression, agriculture, and the towing industry. In all, seven bills were passed to start the short legislative week.