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Guest Columns

  • Holiday entertainment abounds in Kentucky

    With only about two-and-a-half weeks left before Christmas, time is drawing short for those looking for the perfect gift or a holiday event to attend.
    Fortunately, there is help available, beginning with the Kentucky Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet and the Kentucky Arts Council. The websites for both (Kentuckytourism.com and artscouncil.ky.gov) have collected long lists of available businesses and attractions that are doing their part to make the season special.

  • Reading Recovery implemented at Trimble’s elementary schools
  • Kentucky making great strides in higher education

    It may not have generated much publicity, but Kentucky’s economy hit a high-water mark in October, when our civilian labor force saw its biggest one-month gain in at least 40 years. It grew by almost 15,000 during those 31 days, putting us just shy of two million people who are either working or actively looking for a job.

  • Administration to continue to seek answers to financial needs faced by Trimble schools

    Dear Readers,

  • $1.9 billion needed for infrastructure improvements

    Other than during a rare boil-water advisory, most of us don’t think twice when we turn on the faucet. We just expect clean and plentiful water to be there.
    For about 95 percent of Kentuckians, that’s exactly what we get each and every day from the 400-plus public and community water systems that serve the commonwealth. These systems meet or exceed health-based standards at an incredible rate of 99.73 percent.

  • A dangerous duck

    The phrase “lame duck” was first used in London in the 18th century.  It was slang for a stockbroker who could not pay off his debts.  In this country, it was later used to describe a politician who has lost re-election or is not running again, but who stays in office for the remainder of his term.  In fact, President Lincoln was one of the first to use the term here in the United States, when he said, “a senator or representative out of business is a sort of lame duck.  He has to be provided for.”

  • Legislation aimed at prevention of child abuse studied

    The start of the 2017 legislative session is still a couple of months away, but the groundwork for what hopefully will become one of its most significant laws began last week.
    It kicked off with the first meeting of the House Task Force on Child Abuse and Exploitation Prevention, which House Speaker Greg Stumbo authorized earlier this fall to see what more we can do to protect children, whether they are at home, on the playground, at camp or school or anywhere in-between.

  • Rand endorses resource protection

    Over the last 50 years, usually around the time fall colors are in full bloom, state and federal officials dedicate a week to highlight all of the products our forests provide.
    Kentucky, of course, has been blessed more than most states. Trees cover nearly half of our 25 million acres, and we are among the nation’s leaders – and first in the South – when it comes to hardwood production.

  • Tax rate questions answered and their impact locally

    Dear Readers,
    This week I would like to clear up some questions I have had about tax rates in the county and how the nickel tax will impact the tax rates pass or fail. I hope to give a better understanding by clearly defining the 4% tax rate, Compensating Tax Rate, and the Recallable Nickel Tax Rate (should it pass.) The bullets below explain these items for the current year:

  • Domestic violence numbers in Kentucky sobering

    Each September, domestic violence-prevention programs across the country take part in a one-day census to illustrate what they and the victims they serve face at any given moment.
    The numbers are sobering. In 2015, the most recent year available, 40,000 people nationwide sought shelter during that 24-hour period and another 31,500 received non-residential assistance in such areas as the courts, childcare and transportation.