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Editor's Desk

  • Hydroplanes bring excitement, chances to renew friendships

    The 2011 Trimble County Fair may be history but local residents have a weekend of entertainment to look forward to as the world’s fastest watercraft power into the Ohio River valley to challenge for the Lucas Oil Indiana Governor’s Cup.

  • Alumni needed to plan centennial, scholarship events

    I have the responsibility of serving as the presiding officer of the Alumni Association this year.

    The Trimble County Alumni Association will meet at the Trimble County Public Library at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 30. The meeting is open to all persons interested in event planning for next year’s Alumni Banquet and the upcoming centennial of Trimble County High School.

  • Concert review: Band music is alive and well at TCHS

    Harold Rothert would be pleased.

    Instrumental music is alive and well in the Trimble County school system. Monday’s concert at the Trimble County Middle School gymnasium featured not only good band music but a houseful of parents and grandparents who beamed with pride as the sixth grade band, the seventh and eighth grade band and high school band presented their annual spring concert.

    Who was Harold Rothert?

  • High school plays produced memories that won’t go away

    High school plays, I remember them well.

    Some of my most memorable moments from the old halls of Trimble revolve around the dramas presented by the junior and senior classes from days of yore.

    There were a number of great productions directed by the husband and wife team James and Martha Quisenberry in the mid-1960s in old McCain Auditorium. After the Quisenberry’s left Trimble after the 1965-66 school year, Carl Rucker and Nina Coffin stepped in to direct several productions through the end of my high school days.

  • Banner editor encourages readers’ stories of celebrities

    I have enjoyed many roles in my professional career: journalist, musician, announcer/broadcaster, author and laborer. Most of those roles have provided avenues to rub shoulders with celebrities from all walks of life.

    I’ve hung out with racing celebrities including several Indianapolis 500 winners, almost every famous personage in boat racing over the past 40 years and Carroll Shelby (yes, the designer of the Shelby Cobras).

  • Alumni event short on attendance but enjoyable

    Saturday’s annual gathering of the alumni of Trimble County’s schools was somewhat disappointing for alumni banquet organizers.

    Don’t get me wrong. The meal prepared by the Trimble County school corporation’s cafeteria staff was nothing short of excellent. The fellowship of those in attendance was enthusiastic and cheerful. The Bedford Elementary School cafeteria facility provides an outstanding venue for revelers from school days past.

    What was missing? You!

  • Banner joins couple’s campaign to raise ALS awareness

    I have some local friends who are waging a campaign to raise awareness of Trimble Countians and others in the local region about the incurable disease clinically known as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, or ALS.

    Bedford residents Bob and Dianne McKinney have a special interest in helping to raise money for research to hopefully find a cure for those diagnosed with ALS in the future.

  • Father’s ministry led editor’s family to Trimble County

    First of all, I am not a Trimble County native.
    I was hatched in a small hospital in the tiny, hospitable hamlet of Milan in Ripley County, Ind. Two years after Milan recovered from my birth tiny Milan High School won the Indiana high school basketball state championship. Yep, the same burr-headed Milan Indians that the movie “Hoosiers” was based on went to school with my older siblings. My brother still maintains contact with several of the former players these many years later.

  • Mid-life crisis or ‘Extreme Makeover: Professional Edition’?

    I’m pretty sure it’s a mid-life crisis.
    But I can’t afford to buy a convertible, so I’ve decided, instead, to redefine myself – professionally speaking. Kind of like Madonna, but without the flair.
    It’s with mixed emotions that I put together my last issue as editor of The Trimble Banner. I’ve decided to start my own business and see what else is out there in the world.

  • Strict spay/neuter laws likely would reduce shelter costs

    Animal control can be a large expense to county and metropolitan taxpayers, and there is one central reason why: irresponsible pet ownership.
    Basically, overcrowded animal shelters and overwhelmed animal welfare groups are cleaning up messes made by people who refuse to do the right thing when it comes to their pets. Trust me, I know exactly how expensive this can be.
    Over the past eight years or so, Trimble and Henry counties had been paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to the Kentucky Humane Society to handle local animal control.