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Today's News

  • Kozar resigns as CEO at Carroll County Memorial

    By TIM HENDRICK

    Landmark News Service

    Carroll County Memorial Hospital CEO Michael Kozar announced his resignation to CCMS board chairman Dennis Raisor in a letter dated Nov. 11, 2015.

    Kozar will become CEO of Northwest Florida Community Hospital in Chipley, Fla. Jan. 1, 2016.

    In an interview Tuesday, Kozar said that his departure was not caused by a lack of satisfaction by either side but an opportunity that he could not turn down.

  • Public Records for the week of Nov. 26, 2015

    Items published in court news are public record.

    The Trimble Banner publishes all misdemeanors, felonies and small-claims judgments recorded in district court, as well as all civil suits recorded in circuit court. Juvenile court cases are not published.

    Crime reports are provided by local law enforcement agencies. Charges or citations reported to The Trimble Banner do not imply guilt.

    FELONY

  • Give something that means something — Give blood or host a blood drive

    The American Red Cross encourages individuals and organizations to give something that means something this winter by making a lifesaving blood donation or hosting a blood drive.

    Blood donations often decline from now to New Year’s Day when holiday festivities pull people away from their donation appointments. Seasonal illnesses, such as colds and the flu, can also have a serious impact on blood donations

  • Crystanomoly Cats: Cats are bad micromanagers

    By CRYSTAL CAUDILLO

  • Nutrient management plan basics aid farmers

    By MICHAEL PYLES

    Manure can be a valuable fertilizer if you store and use it correctly on your farm. But just how valuable? A recent University of Kentucky research project studied 10 cattle in a confined area for 200 days.

    In that time period, the animals created an estimated 62 tons of manure. When compared to fertilizer prices the nutrient value of the manure was worth more than $2,100.

    So maybe it’s better to focus on the value rather than seeing manure management as a time-consuming hassle.

  • Foods containing GMOs have no safety concerns

    By JANE PROCTOR

    Genetically engineered foods have been available to consumers since the mid- to late-1990s. In fact, most of us have eaten food that contains ingredients from GMO crops without even knowing it.

    So how do you know which foods contain a genetically modified crop as an ingredient?

    Well, that’s not so easy.

  • Superintendent's Corner: Change can be difficult, but is a fact everyone will face throughout life

    By STEVE MIRACLE

    “Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.”

    — Leo Tolstoy

    A few weeks back, in a weekly message to all staff, I shared some thoughts about change. This week I would like to begin to share that message with you.

    Change is a difficult thing to accept at times, yet when you take time to think of it we are in a constant state of change from birth. It is something we should have mastered by now but most of us continue to struggle with change.

  • CCMH recognized in top 10 for patient health outcomes

    Carroll County Memorial Hospital has been recognized as one of Kentucky’s top 10 acute care hospitals for excellence in outcomes.

    The rankings from the National Organization of State Offices of Rural Health and iVantage Health Analytics are based on factors including patient safety indicators, readmissions and mortality. The recognition for CCMH is part of National Rural Health Day on Nov. 19, which celebrates the accomplishment of rural health organizations this year, according to information from the sponsoring organizations.

  • Trimble teams open hoops season next week
  • Record duck numbers portend good waterfowl hunting in 2015-16

    The work done by conservation groups as well as state and federal fish and wildlife agencies over the past 60 years to increase waterfowl populations is nothing short of remarkable.

    “This year, we’ve had the highest counts of ducks as a whole by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Canadian Wildlife Service,” said John Brunjes, migratory bird coordinator for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. “It is the highest counts ever with 49,522,000 ducks as well as 11,643,000 mallards, also a new record.”