Today's News

  • Resolution urges judges to treat Christians with dignity, respect

    ELIZABETHTOWN, Ky. – Kentucky Baptists object to what they see as a growing anti-Christian bias in the U.S. judicial system, and they’re calling on judges to treat followers of Jesus with respect and dignity afforded them by God and the U.S. Constitution.
    Messengers to the Kentucky Baptist Convention Annual Meeting at Severns Valley Baptist Church in Elizabethtown passed a resolution Tuesday that serves as a reminder that the First Amendment guarantees the free exercise of religion to every U.S. citizen.

  • Milton Methodists host Soup and Chili meal tomorrow

    Saturday November 14 Milton United Methodist Church will have a Soup and Chili meal. The meal will include your choice of: Bean, and vegetable soup or chili, a sandwich, drink and a dessert for $7.00 (what a great price). We will also have a baked goods auction (YUM!). Our church has some awesome bakers. The eating will begin at 4:30 p.m. and last until 7:00 p.m. with the auction beginning at 5:30. Come enjoy great food, and fun with the auction. See you there.

  • Revival services this weekend at Apostolic Pentecostal Church of the Living God

    The Apostolic Pentecostal Church of the Living God, 124 Smith Lane, Bedford, will be holding revival services, Friday, Nov. 13, and Saturday, Nov. 14, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 15 at 6:30 p.m. The speaker is Brother Jerry Cottrell from Palestine, West Virginia. All are invited. For more information, contact Pastor Bobby Wade 502-255-7510

  • The gift of misery

    I spent this past weekend feeling sad.
    The reason isn’t important — actually, there really wasn’t a reason other than I just felt like being sad, and so I was.
    I called my sister to tell her that I was sad, but she was at her granddaughter’s soccer game and didn’t answer her phone, which made me even sadder.
    I would’ve told my husband I was sad, but he would just tell me all the reasons I have not to be sad or he’d give me a pep talk, which is not the proper response to sadness, in my opinion.


    Nov. 14, 1985 (30 years ago)
    The Bedford city commissioners are concerned about the city’s liability insurance. Mayor Jim Black said at the last city meeting that while the insurance company had not yet received any letters regarding the situation yet, there could be little or no notice of the city’s insurance being cancelled. Black said that the city’s insurance comes due January 8 but if the policy is renewed, the commission could expect a 30, 40 or 50 percent increase in rates.  

  • Honoring Kentucky’s veterans

    One hundred years ago, “the war to end all wars” ravaged Europe. What we now call World War I ended in part thanks to the more than four million Americans who mobilized to join the Allied Powers’ fight overseas. Over 100,000 of them did not return home. The war ended on November 11, 1918, and the commemoration of that day has become the holiday we now observe as Veterans Day.

  • Transition period underway for state government

    While last week’s gubernatorial election marked the end of this year’s campaign season, it also kicked off the beginning of a transition period that has been guided by tradition and the state constitution for much of our history.
    Not quite 60 people have served as governor since Kentucky joined the United States in 1792. In the beginning, voters did not have a direct say; instead, the decision was made by a group of electors, similar to our presidential elections today.


    Thursday, Nov. 12
    Trimble County Senior Citizens Center movie at 10:00 a.m.
    The Trimble County Local Emergency Planning Committee will meet at 6:30 p.m., at the Trimble County Cooperative Extension Service, 43 High Country Lane in Bedford. Agendas will be handed out at the meeting. For more information, call 502-558-6329.
    Milton City Commission will meet at 7 p.m. at the Milton Municipal Building.
    Fri.-Sun., Nov. 13-15

  • Students get taste of adulthood in ‘Reality Store’

    Special to The Trimble Banner
    Stakeholders, 4-H extension agent, students and educators come together one day a year to assist sophomores and eighth graders with adulthood “reality.” The students begin with choosing a career based on their GPA. They are then assigned children (if any) and their ages. Next they attend a multitude of “real life” booths to pay for items such as: childcare, utilities, furniture, transportation, taxes and much more.