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Today's News

  • Natural gas to cost slightly more this winter

    FRANKFORT, Ky. – Kentucky residents who heat their homes with natural gas will see somewhat higher prices at the start of the 2017-2018 heating season than they did a year ago, the Kentucky Public Service Commission advised last week.
    Gas prices have risen, on average, about 13 percent from this time last year, but are still about 58 percent below the November 2008 average price of $11.70.

  • Trimble’s Community Education Program Shawna Jent’s subject at Rotary meeting

    By CHARLES LISTON
    Special to The Trimble Banner
    Some pretty amazing, less-known, positive happenings are going on in our county. Often, as we “long out of school” citizens are quick to criticize local school activities as somewhat distant and disconnected (except if we have kids in sports of course), find that many school connected educational programs are reaching out, working to provide community educational and volunteer opportunities. Such is the “Community Education Program” (CEP) of Kentucky.

  • Veterans invited to Veterans Day events at BES, MES

    Trimble County Schools will be hosting special events in conjunction with Veterans Day next week. As Veterans Day officially falls on Saturday this year, scheduled events will be held during the week prior at both elementary schools.
    Milton Elementary School’s Veterans Day luncheon and program will be on Wednesday, Nov. 8, with the veterans’ lunch at 12:30 and the program at 1:15 p.m.

  • TCHS art students to showcase in Vevay

    By Rylee Hallgarth and Kaili Baxter
    Special to The Trimble Banner
    Being able to be featured in the Vevay Art Center’s art show is a big accomplishment for 15 students from Bonnie Peugeot-Medows’ class at Trimble County High School.

  • 1st NINE WEEKS HONOR ROLLS

    BEDFORD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
    All A
    Fourth Grade—Gavin Beisler, Anna Brierly, Briley Clifford, Morgan Stark, Avery Stockdale and Zachary Rice
    Fifth Grade—Hannah Chilton, Lauren LaMothe, Colton O’Neal, Landon Tuttle, Elane Wightman and Jolie Wilcoxson
    Sixth Grade—Adeline Howerton
    All A&B

  • America’s family farmers and ranchers let down

    By Rhea Landholm
    Center for Rural Affairs
    Family farmers and ranchers have waited years for the U.S. Department of Agriculture to institute basic fairness protections in the poultry and livestock industries.
    However, last week, officials announced a rollback of two rules of the Grain Inspection, Packers, and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA); decided not to move forward with an interim final rule of the Farmer Fair Practices; and said they will take no further action on a proposed regulation of the Farmer Fair Practices Rule.

  • USDA announces enrollment period for Safety Net Coverage in 2018

    WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Monday announced that starting Nov. 1, 2017, farmers and ranchers with base acres in the Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) or Price Loss Coverage (PLC) safety net program may enroll for the 2018 crop year. The enrollment period will end on Aug. 1, 2018.  

  • YOUTH LEAGUE FOOTBALL RAIDERS
  • Martin Luther meets Jesus

    By MICHAEL JINKINS
    President, Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary
    Martin Luther came to a religious calling via a thunderstorm on a sultry day in 1505. He was then, as the great church historian Roland Bainton has explained, a student of twenty-one years returning to the University of Erfurt following a visit home.

  • ‘Harvest Hymns’ and random thoughts

    The other day someone congratulated our features editor, Sarah Gatling, on her promotion, which was nice, except she didn’t get a promotion.
    Sarah said if she got a promotion she’d like to be promoted to potentate -- that sounds like a cool thing to be, she said.
    It reminded me of the hymn, “Crown Him With Many Crowns,” in which Jesus is called “the potentate of time,” and also reminded me that a few years ago, Sarah gave me a very old hymnal, copyrighted in 1924, called “Harvest Hymns.”