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Today's News

  • Alleged victim files civil suit against physician

    Landmark News Service

  • Alleged victim files civil suit against physician

    Landmark News Service

  • Alleged victim files civil suit against physician

    Landmark News Service

  • Webb retires after 32 years carrying mail

    Snow, rain heat and the gloom of night are nothing compared to the hazards mail carriers face on the job these days.
    Bedford resident Bob Webb said he’s been bitten by dogs, attacked by a rooster and even shot at during the 32 years he carried mail for the Bedford Post Office. Webb retired from that job Friday, Dec. 3, amongst friends and co-workers who honored him with an open house at the post office.
    Oddly, it was the rooster that did the most damage. Lifting up his left pantleg, he showed several patches where the wounds have yet to heal.

  • 1958 film gives glimpse of Trimble County in bygone era

    When Metro-Goldwyn-Meyer announced in July 1958 that a new movie starring Frank Sinatra would be filmed in and around the Madison area, the rush of excitement in the region was overwhelming.

    Movie stars, production crew and gaffers by the busload swarmed into the area in early August, and Madison was transformed into a multi-block Hollywood movie set. Director Vincente Minelli, actresses Shirley MacLaine and Martha Hyer, and actors Dean Martin and Arthur Kennedy were among those joining Sinatra in town for the production of “Some Came Running.”

  • PERFORMERS

    Jefferson Community and Technical College student Trent Mullikin was presented Nov. 17 with a $2,000 “Tools for Tomorrow”scholarship from W.W. Grainger at the Carrollton campus.  Only 150 scholarships are given each year by Grainger, and only two of those go to students in the Kentucky Community and Technical College System. Mullikin, a Trimble county resident, is in the engineering technology  program at JCTC Carrollton. Upon graduation, Mullikin also will receive $1,000 worth of tools from Grainger to help him begin his career.

  • New laws seek more oversight of quasi-government agencies

    When we think of state and local governments, it is certainly understandable that much of our focus is on elected offices.
    They are the ones, after all, that ultimately decide the direction the Commonwealth takes.
    But that should not underscore the critical importance of literally hundreds of quasi-government boards and agencies that range from the large – like the Kentucky Lottery Corporation – to such smaller ones as water, fire and library districts. They, too, touch our daily lives, often in ways we may not even realize.

  • CORRECTION

    Names of children in Mrs. Welty’s second-grade class listed in last week’s honor roll were inadvertently switched. We apologize for the error.
    The following is how the Milton Elementary School’s second-grade honor students should have been listed:
    All A
    Grade two: Rachael Liter, Seamus Montgomery, Elly Buchanan, Jackson Consley, Ryan England, Brooke Liter, Jesse Peak, Marissa Snow, Maggie Stevens and Allie Wilberding,
    All A-B

  • Dense, seasoned wood best for fireplace/woodstove

    Every winter, we look forward to the pleasure of warming our hands and feet by a blazing fire, mesmerized by the dancing flames.
    While I don’t have a fireplace or wood stove myself, several of my neighbors do, and the aroma of their wood stoves brings back many childhood memories. There is just something about the aroma of a good fireplace.

  • Indoor humidity adds comfort in winter

    Winter weather in Kentucky tends to present challenges in the form of snow, ice and freezing temperatures.  
    What isn’t talked about, though, is the discomfort caused by weather inside the home. The itch that plagues many people during winter can be the result of inside air that does not contain adequate moisture.
    Low humidity levels can cause high levels of discomfort including dry skin and stuffy sinuses.