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Today's News

  • PUBLIC RECORDS – Feb. 7-11

    Items published in court news are public record.
    The Trimble Banner publishes all misdemeanors, felonies and small-claims judgments recorded in district court, as well as all civil suits recorded in circuit court. Juvenile court cases are not published.
    Crime reports are provided by local law enforcement agencies. Charges or citations reported to The Trimble Banner do not imply guilt. The following court cases were heard the week of Feb. 7-11, 2011.

    FELONIES

  • New shelter could be built, operational by July 1

    The Trimble Banner
    Officials from Henry and Trimble counties are preparing to enter an interlocal agreement to move forward a project to build an animal shelter.
    Approval of the agreement was on the agenda for Henry County’s Fiscal Court meeting after deadline Tuesday.
    Local officials learned at the end of December that Louisville-based Kentucky Humane Society had decided not to renew its contracts with the two counties.

  • Madison man, 23, jumps to death from bridge

    The Trimble Banner
    MADISON, Ind. – A 23-year-old man leapt from the Milton-Madison Bridge to his death at 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 12.
    Madison Police Chief Yancy Denning said James T. Taulbee of Madison stopped his car on the bridge, got out of his car and jumped over the railing. The bridge is 95 feet above the Ohio River.
    Denning said an onlooker who called 911 reportedly tried to stop Taulbee, but could not get to the man in time.

  • JUST IN AT TCPL
  • FEBRUARY: EARTHQUAKE AWARENESS MONTH

    Earthquakes that occur in the New Madrid fault zone are potential threats to portions of seven U.S. states – Kentucky, Indiana, Tennessee, Illinois, Arkansas and Missouri.
    In Kentucky, the fault lies in Western Kentucky, crossing the Ohio River in two places.
    During a major earthquake, you may hear roaring or a rumbling sound that gradually grows louder. You may feel a rolling sensation that starts out gently and, within seconds, becomes violent.

  • Small changes can yield big savings

    The recent economic situation has many people trying to save more money.  In 2005, the personal savings rate had fallen to below 1 percent, indicating that many Americans were spending either all or even more than they were earning. 
    The current personal savings rate, nearly 6 percent, shows more Americans are building their savings.
    Savings provides many people with a feeling of financial security – knowing they have money set aside to pay off debt, prepare for retirement, or purchase a big-ticket item, such as a house or car. 

  • Planning your own lunches can be fun and educational

    Selections from the school cafeteria don’t always tickle the taste buds. So, if you are a do-it-yourself kind of person who wants to pack your own lunch, here’s how.
    Plan ahead. Write down ideas for each school-day menu and review them with mom or dad to come up with a week’s worth. Go grocery shopping so you can help pick foods you like or want to try.
    Prepackaged foods aren’t always your best choice; they taste good and are easy to prepare., but many contain excessive quantities of calories, fat and salt.

  • Now’s time to renovate hayfields, pastures

    The drought of 2010 was extremely hard on Trimble County pastures and hayfields. Now is the optimal time to consider renovating these fields.
    To be sure you use legume varieties that will perform well in your area, call the Trimble County Cooperative Extension Service office at (502) 255-7188 for the results of forage variety trials from the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture.
    These trials, among others, will help you pick the best varieties for your particular operation.

  • Learning to let go allows woman to find true love

    I have an inspiring story about a very unhappy young woman who was one of my clients.
    Linda’s depression resulted from the break-up with her boyfriend months earlier. She had not been able to pick up the pieces and move on.
    Her thoughts kept returning to what she had lost and what she had done wrong. Mike, her ex, refused to talk to Linda, and he had actually started a serious relationship with Betty. It was up to Linda to work on building a path to her future.

  • PUBLIC RECORDS, Feb. 9

    FELONIES