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Today's News

  • Prank 911 call trouble for Carroll boys

    Two boys who made a prank call to Carroll County 911 last week could face a felony charge. The boys reported that a 16-year-old girl had been shot in English, but the call was false.

    Carroll County Central Dispatch received a call at 1:59 p.m. that a 16-year-old girl had been shot. The caller was hysterical and the dispatcher was unable to get an address before the caller hung up. However, the dispatch center’s technology allowed the dispatcher to determine the call came from Rail Street in English.

  • Trimble County Sheriff's Log

    Monday, Oct. 1
    7:52 a.m., school zone traffic detail, Trimble County High School
    8:40 a.m., school visit, Milton Elementary School
    9:39 a.m., juvenile out of control, Trimble County Middle School
    9:58 a.m., school visit, Trimble County High School
    1:15 p.m., fight, Trimble County Middle School
    2:55 p.m., school zone traffic detail
    3:39 p.m., suicide attempt or threat, 1300 block Stark Ln

    Tuesday, Oct. 2
    7:12 a.m., federal overtime traffic detail, 12000 U.S. 421N

  • TRIMBLE COUNTY SCHOOL LUNCH MENUS

    BEDFORD/MILTON ELEMENTARY
    Offered @ Breakfast Daily:Milk/Juice/Fruit/Cereal/Toast
    Breakfast -- free
    Lunch -- $1.85
    Milk  -- .45
    Offered Daily:  Milk / Juice / Chef Salad / Yogurt
    All bread is whole grain
    Monday, Oct. 22: Hot dog on bun, chili sauce, sweet potato puffs, chilled broccoli, applesauce or grapes.
    Tuesday, Oct. 23: Spaghetti w/meat sauce, salad, peas, orange wedges or pineapple tidbits.

  • April Hoskins in NOVA program at Eastern

    RICHMOND, KY – Bedford resident April Hoskins is among the 206 participants in Eastern Kentucky University’s NOVA program, which serves students with academic potential who are the first in their family to pursue a four-year degree.

    Hoskins, a 2009 Trimble County High School graduate, is a senior Chemistry major at EKU.

  • TCMS Spirit Week

    By Brooke Humphreys

    Spirit is contagious, at least that is what the teachers, students and staff at Trimble County Middle School would say. The week of Sept. 17-21 was named Spirit Week at TCMS. During this week there were scheduled themes for each day. Everyone was encouraged to participate. The cheerleaders came up with the themes and set different incentives for those who showed the most school spirit.

  • Trimble grad raises achievement in 3 districts in 6 years

    EDITOR’S NOTE: The following article was published in the September 2012 issue of District Administration, the most widely read publication for K12 district-level school leaders nationwide. It spotlights the work of Josh Powell, a 1993 Trimble County High School graduate who is currently the District Superintendent of Montgomery County (Ky.) schools. Josh is the son of the late Billy Jo Powell and the late Suzanne Graham, both of whom were also TCHS alumni.

    By Jennifer Elise Chase

  • Watch out for deer!

    FRANKFORT, Ky. - Attention motorists: watch out for deer while driving Kentucky highways this fall.

    Deer movement peaks in late October through early December, during the rut, the whitetail’s annual mating season.

    Motorists should be on the lookout for deer crossing roads, especially at dusk and dawn, when deer are feeding and bucks are beginning to follow or chase does.

  • Gun discharged at McDonald’s

    Customers having lunch at the Carrollton McDonald’s received quite a shock last week after a handgun fell from a woman’s purse and discharged inside the restaurant.

  • Lawmakers hear about state fuel lab problems from ag officials

    FRANKFORT—A transportation fuel testing lab that state Department of Agriculture officials say was losing around $900,000 a year under the department’s last administration is on track to save roughly $400,000 this year, according to department officials.

  • Thinking of taking creek gravel? State requires permit from DNR

    Many landowners and small enterprises, including local governments, routinely obtain gravel from creeks and streams for road maintenance and fill.

    While this is an inexpensive way to obtain gravel, it is also illegal. Kentucky regulations clearly require anyone (including governments) to obtain a permit from the Department for Natural Resources before removing gravel from a creek. Anyone found removing gravel from a creek without a permit is subject to citation and monetary penalties up to $5,000 per day.