Today's News

  • Legislators look to stop non-traditional instruction

    The availability of “Raider Days” by Trimble County Schools during closures in the wintertime could go by the wayside if Senate Bill 73 makes it through the 2018 General Assembly.

  • Ohio River ice proved destructive to maritime trade a century ago

    The oppressive arctic conditions that prevailed throughout the Ohio River Valley and along the river’s tributaries in the winter of 1917-18 continued late into January. The 12th day of 1918 “was probably the coldest and most disagreeable day experienced in a century,” reported the Monthly Weather Review. Temperatures remained below zero all day, according to the National Weather Service.

  • New voting machine demonstration at clerk’s office

    Ross Roberson of Harp Enterprises set up two of Trimble County's new voting machines for demonstration purposes Monday in the deed room of the Trimble County Clerk's Office. Harp Enterprises provides voting machines for 97 of the 120 counties in Kentucky. Voters can cast a fictional paper ballot or use the disability voting machine, also set up, to print a ballot with the voter’s selections. The two machines will be set up for 30 days, said County Clerk Tina Browning.

  • Health department says flu is now epidemic in Ky.


    Kentucky Health News

    The state Department for Public Health says this season’s influenza activity is now considered an epidemic.

    Health officials warned this season’s strain of the flu virus can be extremely serious, even deadly – and not just for those in high-risk categories. In general, children, the elderly, extremely obese people, and those with chronic health conditions or weak immune systems are considered at higher risk of getting the flu.

  • Regional training addresses opioid epidemic

    Landmark News Service

    Oldham County Police Sergeant James Brown was one of several officials who spoke at a community-wide opioid training event March 6 at the Oldham County Health Department.

    Opioids are a class of drugs that include heroin, fentanyl, methadone, hydromorphone, hydrocodone and oxycodone.

  • Public records | March 22, 2018

    Items published in court news are public record.

    The Trimble Banner publishes all misdemeanors, felonies and small-claims judgments recorded in district court, as well as all civil suits recorded in circuit court. Juvenile court cases are not published.

    Crime reports are provided by local law enforcement agencies. Charges or citations reported to The Trimble Banner do not imply guilt.

    The following cases were heard the week of March 12 with the Honorable Judge Diane E. Wheeler presiding:


  • Sheriff's call log | March 22, 2018

    March 12

    12:07 p.m., criminal mischief, Rio Vista Apartments

    March 13

    11:07 a.m., investigative follow up, Rio Vista Apartments

    1:19 p.m., investigative follow up, Rodgers Road

    5:12 p.m., suicide attempt or threat, location not provided

    7:48 p.m., process service, 263 Agan Way

    8:38 p.m., process service, 1200 U.S. 42E

    March 14

    8:16 a.m., lock out, 321 Garriott Court

    9:43 a.m., assault, 21 Mullins Drive

    11:02 a.m., warrant service, 21 Woodlawn Road

  • Community calendar | March 22, 2018

    Thursday, March 22

    The Wildflowers of Kentucky, the first class of the “DIY” series sponsored by the Trimble County Public Library and the Trimble County Extension Service, starts at 6 p.m. at the library. Former agriculture agent Michael Pyles will be the guest presenter. The class is free, although the extension service requests that RSVPs be made by calling the extension office at 502-255-7188.

  • At the Library | March 22, 2018

    Knitting class

    Learn new knitting skills and make a slouchy knitted hat at 11 a.m. today. Bring size 5 & 7 knitting needles and worsted weight yarn. The group is open to ages 14 and up. The class meets in the library meeting room.

    Wildflowers of Kentucky

  • Dr. Hines introduces new chiropractors to Rotary

    Special to the Banner

    Potential wellness from regular chiropractic checkups and introductions of new, professional chiropractors to serve our communities were the subjects of our March 13 Bedford Rotary meeting.

    Dr. Mark Hines, who established Campbellsburg Chiropractic several years ago, spoke of the advantages of chiropractic checkups for enhancing “wellness from within,” and noted the extensive training one goes through to become licensed.