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Today's News

  • Kentucky Beef Expo this weekend in Louisville

    Kentucky, with its ever-increasing interest in purebred livestock, offers purebred cattle breeders one of the most unique and effective state-supported promotional events ever developed – the Kentucky Farm Bureau Beef Expo. This year marks the 23rd Annual Expo, which is held the first weekend in March, at the Kentucky Fair and Exposition Center in Louisville, Kentucky. This may only be the 23rd year of the expo, but looking back at previous years, the Kentucky Beef Expo actually has more history before its state supported start in 1987.

  • Key to preventing colon cancer may be in your gut

    March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. It’s a good time to raise awareness about the third-most common cancer in the United States and talk about possible ways to prevent it. Recently, scientists have begun to show that a healthy gut may play an important role in colorectal cancer prevention.

  • Family mealtime is a tasty base for healthy development

    Between work, community activities and running errands, meals on the go have become a staple for many American families. You may not realize it, but taking those few extra moments to sit down for a meal with your family fills more than just your stomachs.

  • KDH offering free colon cancer testing

    MADISON, Ind. – In recognition of Colon Cancer Awareness Month in March, King’s Daughters’ Health (KDH) will again be providing free take-home, DNA-based colon cancer testing kits through its physician/provider offices. Testing kits are available from physicians who care for adult patients - Family Medicine and Internal Medicine providers.

  • Old Man Winter pitched a fit

    CRYSTAL CAUDILLO

    I’ve lived by the river for six years. Of those six years, three have involved flooding. I understand that rivers will flood. I’ve lived near the river my entire life.

  • Flood safety tips from Kentucky emergency management

     Kentucky Emergency Management

    Kentucky Emergency Management activated its State Emergency Operations Center in support of heavy rainfall and flooding conditions throughout Kentucky forecasted over the next several days. The SEOC has activated at a Level 4, which consists of KYEM personnel monitoring the weather system and damage reports from affected counties.

  • Ohio River forecast to reach moderate flood stage

    This story will be updated as needed.

    Update No. 14 (10 a.m. Wednesday): KY 36 has reopened to traffic and KY 1848 (Corn Creek Road) has also reopened, according to the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. Both roads reopened overnight after being closed due to flooding.

    Update No. 13 (9 p.m. Monday): The Ohio River crested earlier this morning. The Clifty Creek gauge had the river level at 457.3 feet, just above moderate flood stage.

  • Rising river to crest Saturday

    Editor's note: The National Weather Service has updated its river level forecast since the information provided at press time. The weather service now says the river will crest at 52.9 feet Saturday morning. A flood warning is in effect for portions of Trimble County along the river while the remainder of the county remains under a flood watch.

  • Rand, Hornback to face challengers in November

    The 47th House District has been represented by Rick Rand since 2003. In November’s general election, he’ll face an opponent, the first Republican he’s faced for the seat in eight years.

    Mark Gilkison, a Republican from Henry County, filed for the office Jan. 26 in Frankfort. Gilkison, a 1989 graduate of Oldham County High School, operates several businesses in the district, including Gilkison’s Mini Storage in Trimble County, according to a news release.

  • Dow donates $5K to Trimble library

    By THOMAS CIFRANIK
    Special to the Banner

    The Dow Chemical Company’s Carrollton manufacturing site is celebrating its 50th anniversary by partnering with the Dow Corning Foundation to donate $5,000 to 10 libraries each in surrounding counties. The public libraries were chosen due to the number of patrons positively impacted by resources and services they provide.