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Today's News

  • TRIMBLE COUNTY NEWS OF PUBLIC RECORD

    Items published in court news are public record.
    The Trimble Banner publishes all misdemeanors, felonies and small-claims judgments recorded in district court, as well as all civil suits recorded in circuit court. Juvenile court cases are not published.
    Crime reports are provided by local law enforcement agencies. Charges or citations reported to The Trimble Banner do not imply guilt.
    The following cases were heard in Trimble District Court during the week of June 13, 2016, with the Honorable Judge Jerry Crosby presiding:
    FELONY

  • Pat Day sends regrets
  • Carroll Co. hospital has new CEO

    Trimble Banner Staff Report
    A four-month, nationwide search helped Carroll County Memorial Hospital directors find their new chief executive officer close by in Crestwood.
    CCMH Corp. President Dennis Raisor announced Tuesday that Harry M. Hayes has been hired as the hospital’s new chief executive officer. The hospital board interviewed four finalists from across the United States prior to selecting Hayes for the job.

  • Murder trial delayed third time

    By DAVE TAYLOR
    The Trimble Banner
    The trial of a man accused in the murder of a young woman in a Trimble County mobile home in 2013 has been delayed yet again. The latest delay resulted from a Kentucky Court of Appeal ruling, dated June 9, prohibiting commencement of the trial in Trimble Circuit Court on the June 15 scheduled date.

  • Turnout small in hearing over school plan

    By DAVE TAYLOR
    The Trimble Banner
    A public hearing was held Thursday, June 16, to review with the public the Proposed Draft of the Facilities Plan developed by the Local Planning Committee for the Trimble County Schools.
    Only about 25 persons, including several members of the LPC, attended the hearing and only one individual from the public gave testimony after the plan had been presented.

  • Demand for bourbon means demand for wood

    FRANKFORT—Stacked inside warehouses around Kentucky are millions of bourbon barrels. The name of the distillery stamped on the casks differs from warehouse to warehouse, as does the aging whiskey inside.
    But each barrel has at least one thing in common: the type of wood it is made from.

  • Grants available for beginning farmers

    By Sarah Beaman
    Center for Rural Affairs
    According to the most recent census of agriculture, there are 6 times more farmers over 65 than under 35.  Beginning farmers and ranchers represent a crucial component for the future of agriculture, but they must overcome stern challenges to get started.

  • Lawn versus yard

    My success rate with horticulture is hit or miss. Last year my garden deteriorated into a state of decaying, exploding chaos. I have no clue what happened. Whatever it was it was ugly. I’m positive my Dad is in Heaven shaking his head in dismay. He taught me better than that! I just managed to forget critical elements.

  • Building ‘grand’ fathers

    Many of us have fond memories of our grandfathers… the stories, the candy, the fishing lessons and life lessons we learn while visiting them are things we treasure and carry with us throughout our lives. But as family dynamics have changed, more and more grandfathers are finding the old adage of “spoil them rotten and send them home” no longer a reality. In fact, around 2.4 million grandparents across the United States are now raising their grandchildren.

  • Jenna Rowlett to study in England

    BOWLING GREEN, Ky. – Eighty-six students from The Carol Martin Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky, including Trimble resident Jenna Rowlett, are involved in some form of summer learning and features travel and study abroad opportunities for 54 Gatton Academy students.
    The Gatton Academy is once again partnering with Harlaxton College in Grantham, England, to offer a study abroad course. Jenna Rowlett of Bedford, a member of the Class of 2017, will study Honors: Introduction to Literature with Professor Walker Rutledge of the WKU Department of English.