Today's News

  • Government should build bridges, not roadblocks

    My work as a state legislator may not have much in common with a doctor’s, but when I am considering which bills to support or oppose, I keep that profession’s primary rule in mind: First, do no harm.

    That doesn’t mean there aren’t tough decisions to be made. In an era where costs are outpacing revenues, we’re just not able to do all we would like.

    At the same time, I believe the state needs to do the most good for the most people whenever possible, which is why some of the legislation being considered this year raises concerns.

  • Looking Back and Do You Remember? | Feb. 22, 2018

    Feb. 25, 1988 (30 years ago)

    The Trimble County Historical Society worked on the publication of a yearbook that would have between 50 to 100 pages of historical articles and information and would be free to paid members of the society or available for $10 per copy. The society collected Bible records, Revolutionary War and Civil War pension applications, riverboat landings and more. Membership in the society at the time cost $10 per person or $15 per family.

  • Revival Feb. 23-25 at Apostolic Pentecostal Church of the Living God

    The Apostolic Pentecostal Church of the Living God, 124 Smith Lane in Bedford, invites you to a weekend Revival with Speaker Bro. Jerry Cottrell from Palestine, W.Va. The Revival will be at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 6:30 p.m., Sunday. For more information call Pastor Bobby Wade at 502-255-7510.

  • 'Be like Hur'

    This past Valentine’s Day, the newspaper ran a story I wrote about Harry and Charlotte Austin who have been sweethearts since Charlotte was 10 and Harry was 11.

    They recently celebrated their 70th anniversary.

    I’ve written about them before – they sit behind me in church on Saturday nights.

    For the past five or so years Charlotte has had dementia, and in 2015 she had a stroke that affected her left side.

  • Shooting struggles hurt Raiders in loss to Lloyd

    Stacey May, coach of the Trimble County Raiders, summarized his assessment of his team’s loss in their final regular season game in five words: “Tough shooting night for us!”

    The Raiders placed only one player in double figures and connected on only 13 of 45 field goal attempts en route to a 57-41 loss to Lloyd Memorial Friday at home.

  • Lloyd delivers loss to Lady Raiders to close out season

    The Trimble County Lady Raiders closed out the 2017-18 high school basketball regular season Friday with a 54-39 loss to visiting Lloyd Memorial High School from Erlanger.

    It was an emotional evening as the only senior Lady Raider, Karli Tilley, appeared on the home floor in competition for the final time in a Trimble uniform.

  • Raiders earn home win over Henry's Wildcats

    Sweet revenge! Having lost two contests at New Castle earlier in the season Coach Stacey May’s Trimble County Raiders turned the tables on the visiting Henry County Wildcats last week. The Raiders had fallen in double overtime to the Wildcats on Dec. 28 during the Henry County Invitational Tournament 70-66, and suffered another defeat at Henry on Jan. 19, 74-60. On Tuesday, Feb. 13, the Raiders came ready to play, charged ahead early and battled to a 51-44 victory.

  • 4 minute offense by Lady Wildcats keep Lady Raiders from victory

    Recovering from a slow start in the first half after which they trailed by nine points, the Trimble County Lady Raiders battled back to put themselves within four minutes of capturing a win over the visiting Henry County Lady Wildcats on Tuesday, Feb. 13. However, Henry County made the most of those final four minutes to claim a 36-29 win over Trimble.

    Sophomore Abby Ponder scored all eight of Trimble’s points in the first half as Henry jumped out to a 9-6 advantage after the first eight minutes of play and extended the lead to 17-8 at halftime.

  • How to talk about tragic events with children

    Recent news events in Las Vegas, California, Puerto Rico, Texas and now Florida, discuss acts of violence and natural disasters leaving many of us in a state of shock and awe. As hard as it is for adults to make sense of these unfathomable acts, it is even harder for children. Talking to your children about natural disasters, violence and death is not easy, but can go a long way in making them feel safe, secure and loved.

    Ways you can help your child will be different based on your child’s age, knowledge of the situation and their unique personality.

  • Beautiful but deadly


    It’s been my experience that some of the most beautiful things in the world have a dark side – a very, very dark side. One of the most strikingly colored snakes is highly venomous. The Coral Snake is banded with yellow, red and black stripes. Unfortunately, to be bitten by one of these pretties would prove to be an extremely disappointing way to get close to nature.