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Today's News

  • Comer now a congressman

    Kentucky Press News Service
    James Comer, 44, a Republican, took the oath of office Monday night to become Kentucky’s newest congressman.
    Comer, who narrowly lost the GOP gubernatorial primary last year, will fill the remainder of former Congressman Ed Whitfield’s western Kentucky seat for the current term. But Comer also won his own two-year term in last week’s election.

  • 17th Annual Poster and Essay Contest announced

    FRANKFORT — Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles invites Kentucky students to create and submit original works to show agriculture’s role in addressing the nation’s hunger problem in the Kentucky Department of Agriculture’s (KDA’s) and Kentucky Agriculture and Environment in the Classroom Inc.’s 17th annual Poster and Essay Contest.

  • KDA seeks preliminary proposals for specialty crop grants

    FRANKFORT (November 15, 2016) — The Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) is accepting preliminary proposals for grants to promote and enhance specialty crops through marketing, production, education, and research, Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles has announced.
    “Specialty crops are vital to our horticulture industry and continue to be a growing part of Kentucky’s agricultural landscape,” Commissioner Quarles said. “These funds will provide a boost to Kentucky’s specialty crop industry.”

  • Kentucky Office of Highway Safety reminds Thanksgiving travelers to wear a seat belt – every trip, every time

    FRANKFORT, Ky. – With Thanksgiving quickly approaching, the Kentucky Office of Highway Safety (KOHS) is joining in a national effort to send Thanksgiving travelers an important lifesaving reminder to buckle up – every trip, every time. 
    “The upcoming holiday is one of the busiest travel times of the year, so we’re asking motorists to always wear a seat belt,” said KOHS Executive Director Dr. Noelle Hunter. “If you are properly restrained, your risk of injury or death is greatly reduced.” 

  • Baptist pastors honored for serving courageously, faithfully

    FLORENCE, Ky. – Kentucky Baptist pastors are serving faithfully, courageously and sacrificially in the face of a culture that has become increasingly hostile to the gospel.
    A resolution adopted Tuesday by messengers to the Kentucky Baptist Convention’s annual meeting in Florence, Ky., honored those men serving in some 2,400 churches from the Appalachian Mountains to the Mississippi River.

  • Langley elected president of the Kentucky Baptist Convention

    FLORENCE, Ky. – Bill Langley, senior pastor of an Elizabethtown church with a strong reputation for supporting missions, has been elected president of the 750,000-member Kentucky Baptist Convention.
    Langley, who ran unopposed to lead the state’s largest religious organization, is well known within Baptist circles as a champion of the Cooperative Program, which covers the cost of missionaries stationed in countries around the world.

  • Being Rural

    Aunt Bertie was getting ready for Thanksgiving. She sent Uncle Clovis out to the chicken coop to wring a few hens’ necks. Any of y’all ever done that? If you have – you’re rural.
    Clovis brought a couple of hens back to the kitchen and Aunt Bertie began pulling feathers off.
    Clovis has a little pet monkey named Jack, smartest little critter you’ve ever seen, indeed. Monkey see, monkey do, is his middle name. Jack sat on his stool watching Bertie plucking those chickens.

  • Backyard devastation

    Prior to our marriage my husband had a well-tended, lush back yard. His backyard was approximately an acre. For the purposes of this story I will include the side yard since it has also experienced unrelenting attacks. He mowed and weeded regularly and things ran smoothly along their appointed courses. He had a routine that worked. That was before he met me. Shortly after we married things began to change. The changes weren’t dramatic at first. Things began to shift in a gradual, insidious manner. The first major change came in the form of horses.

  • Let’s talk turkey safety

    It’s nearly Thanksgiving, and soon delicious, juicy turkeys will take center stage at many of our holiday meals. It’s so important that these birds are properly cooked and prepared, because we don’t want anyone to get sick from a food-borne illness.

  • Turkey talk at Thanksgiving

    It’s that time of year when talk turns to turkeys. Technically, there is only one breed of turkey, with several varieties, although many people incorrectly refer to these varieties as breeds.
    Turkeys are raised only for meat. They are not raised for egg production, as with chickens, ducks and quail. As a result, turkeys do not produce very many eggs.
    The most common type of commercial turkey raised in the United States is the Broad-Breasted White. It has a larger breast than the other varieties of turkeys.