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Today's News

  • Carroll Co. hospital has new CEO

    Trimble Banner Staff Report
    A four-month, nationwide search helped Carroll County Memorial Hospital directors find their new chief executive officer close by in Crestwood.
    CCMH Corp. President Dennis Raisor announced Tuesday that Harry M. Hayes has been hired as the hospital’s new chief executive officer. The hospital board interviewed four finalists from across the United States prior to selecting Hayes for the job.

  • Demand for bourbon means demand for wood

    FRANKFORT—Stacked inside warehouses around Kentucky are millions of bourbon barrels. The name of the distillery stamped on the casks differs from warehouse to warehouse, as does the aging whiskey inside.
    But each barrel has at least one thing in common: the type of wood it is made from.

  • Grants available for beginning farmers

    By Sarah Beaman
    Center for Rural Affairs
    According to the most recent census of agriculture, there are 6 times more farmers over 65 than under 35.  Beginning farmers and ranchers represent a crucial component for the future of agriculture, but they must overcome stern challenges to get started.

  • Lawn versus yard

    My success rate with horticulture is hit or miss. Last year my garden deteriorated into a state of decaying, exploding chaos. I have no clue what happened. Whatever it was it was ugly. I’m positive my Dad is in Heaven shaking his head in dismay. He taught me better than that! I just managed to forget critical elements.

  • Building ‘grand’ fathers

    Many of us have fond memories of our grandfathers… the stories, the candy, the fishing lessons and life lessons we learn while visiting them are things we treasure and carry with us throughout our lives. But as family dynamics have changed, more and more grandfathers are finding the old adage of “spoil them rotten and send them home” no longer a reality. In fact, around 2.4 million grandparents across the United States are now raising their grandchildren.

  • Jenna Rowlett to study in England

    BOWLING GREEN, Ky. – Eighty-six students from The Carol Martin Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky, including Trimble resident Jenna Rowlett, are involved in some form of summer learning and features travel and study abroad opportunities for 54 Gatton Academy students.
    The Gatton Academy is once again partnering with Harlaxton College in Grantham, England, to offer a study abroad course. Jenna Rowlett of Bedford, a member of the Class of 2017, will study Honors: Introduction to Literature with Professor Walker Rutledge of the WKU Department of English.

  • Scott Turner among grads at SKYCTC

    Bowling Green, Ky. - Southcentral Kentucky Community and Technical College (SKYCTC) honored Trimble County resident Scott M. Turner among 587 graduates at the College’s Commencement Ceremony, Friday, May 6, 2016. The ceremony was held at the Southern Kentucky Performing Arts Center in Bowling Green, Kentucky.
    “We honor each of our graduates for the hard work they have put forth to achieve their educational goals. We also pay tribute to the family and friends for the great support they give to the graduates,” states Dr. Phillip Neal, President of SKYCTC.

  • Shelby Energy recognizes 2016 scholarship recipients

    Each year, Shelby Energy presents 6 outstanding high school seniors with $1,000 scholarships. These scholarships are given to further their education in any field of study. The recipients are chosen by district in the service territory.
    The 2016 scholarship recipients from Trimble County High School are: Jamie Smith and Gabrielle Murray.
    Congratulations to all of the 2016 recipients! For information about the scholarship program, call Shelby Energy at (800) 292-6585 or visit shelbyenergy.com.

  • TCHS and JCTC prepare high schoolers for college

    By TEENA DRAKE
    Special to The Trimble Banner
    This past school year 10 Trimble County High School students attended classes at the Jefferson Community Technical College Carrolton Campus, allowing the students to participate in college classes and earn dual credits.
    “We had to be very diligent in our studies, managing our time in order to keep up our good grades,” stated student Kallie Kaufman. “It was much different and more time consuming than high school classes.”

  • Coffee shop madness

    The old adage, “Truth is Stranger Than Fiction,” played out while I was eating breakfast one morning in Lynchburg, Tenn., (home of Jack Daniels Distillery and that might explain this story) sitting in one of those quintessential coffee shops that dot the town square of nearly every midwestern and southern town.