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Regional

  • PSC sets public meetings in KU, LG&E rate cases

    FRANKFORT, Ky. - The Kentucky Public Service Commission (PSC) will hold public meetings in Louisville, Lexington, and Madisonville to present information and receive comments on the requests for rate increases by the Kentucky Utilities Co. (KU) and the Louisville Gas & Electric Co. (LG&E).

  • Beshear recommends $142 million decrease in LG&E, KU rate proposal

    FRANKFORT, KY. – Attorney General Andy Beshear announced last week that his Office of Rate Intervention is recommending that the Public Service Commission (PSC) hold LG&E and KU to approximately one-third of the increase requested in recently filed rate cases. 
    The utility companies are asking the PSC for a $210 million increase in annual revenues.
    Beshear’s rate proposal incorporates the testimony of five experts, including an engineer, and asks the PSC to reduce the rate request by $142 million.

  • Hanover College scholars, civic group examine area zip-line feasibility

    Students in the Hanover College Business Scholars Program are working with ENVISION Jefferson County to determine the feasibility of establishing a zip line in the Madison, Ind., area.
    The scholars are conducting research regarding pricing, potential sites and other important factors. As part of this effort, the students seek to gauge local interest and collect opinions through an online survey. The survey is available at www.hanover.edu/ziplinesurvey and on the ENVISION Jefferson County and the City of Madison Facebook pages.

  • Kentucky General Assembly’s 2017 session passes halfway mark 

    FRANKFORT -- With the first half of the General Assembly’s 2017 session in the rear view mirror, some of the session’s major bills have already passed into law while matters like criminal justice reform and education initiatives continue to make steady progress through the legislative process.

  • Kentucky Fish & Wildlife seeking conservation officer recruits

    FRANKFORT, Ky. — Applications are now being accepted for conservation officer recruits at the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. The deadline to apply is Monday, March 6.
    The department plans to fill 25 positions statewide.
    Applicants must be 21 years of age, possess a valid driver’s license and meet educational requirements or have experience in related fields.

  • New Boone marker unveiling

    By Fred Petke
    The Winchester Sun
    A new historical marker will be unveiled in Clark County Friday, marking the kidnapping of Daniel Boone’s daughter and two other girls.
    The marker, which was approved by the Kentucky Historical Society and sponsored by the Winchester-Clark County Heritage Commission, was placed near the Waterfront Restaurant on Athens Boonesboro Road along the Kentucky River.
    The official unveiling will be at 2 p.m. Friday, followed by a reception at the restaurant.

  • Campbell County Recovery Unit: A jail where women go to break heroin’s grip

    By Terry DeMio
    The Kentucky Enquirer
    NEWPORT - They almost look like members of a club, all wearing fitted khakis and red polo shirts. They like to sit in a circle to talk, to laugh and to cry. Every morning, they get up and get dressed for their day. And every so often, to kick back and relax, they’ll be treated to pizza and a movie.

  • KSP investigating Owen non-fatal shooting

    New Columbus, Ky. – The Kentucky State Police at Post 5 Campbellsburg is investigating a non-fatal shooting which occurred Friday, Feb. 17, in Owen County. 

  • Kentucky pair arrested in Madison for passing forged payroll checks

    At approximately 1:45 p.m., Wednesday, February 1, 2017, the City of Madison Police Department received a call of a subject inside German American Bank at 430 Clifty Drive with a fraudulent check.  Lieutenant Dan Slygh, Senior Patrolman Ricky Harris and Patrolman Brian Wyatt responded to the scene.

  • The Week in Frankfort

    FRANKFORT -- State lawmakers returned to the Capitol last week to start the second part of the General Assembly’s 2017 session. The first portion of the session, held over the course of five days in early January, featured a quick start as seven bills were passed into law.
    The second part of the session is sure to feature its own history-making moments as lawmakers consider hundreds of bills – each with the potential to affect people across the state.