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Local News

  • Sanders City Commission

    Voters will be asked to select four candidates. There are only two candidates on the ballot,

    listed here alphabetically. Write-ins allowed.

    Each candidate answered the questionnaire in phone interviews.

    Bobbie Abercrombie, 50

    Owner, Abercrombie Carpet

    Carroll County resident for 30 years

    Has served on the commission

    Why are you seeking re-election?

  • Threat aimed at principal sends student to detention center

    A Milton teen was in court last week, charged with making threats against students and administrators at Trimble County High School.

    Brandon Savage, 18, a student at the school, was arrested Sept. 29 and arraigned the following day on charges of misdemeanor abuse of a teacher, falsely reporting an incident and third-degree terroristic threatening. He was also charged with felony second-degree terroristic threatening.

  • Increased code enforcement stirs up complaints

    For more than a year, residents  have been complaining that city ordinances weren’t being enforced.

    Now that code enforcement has been stepped up, plenty of angry people came to Monday’s Carrollton City Council meeting at City Hall to complain about being cited for violations.

    In September, the city hired Art Zook as an assistant code enforcement official. Since Oct. 1, he has been writing warnings and citations to property owners who are violating city ordinances.

  • District in good fiscal shape

    By SANDIE BANKS

    N-D Correspondent

    The Carroll County Board of Education got a boost for its plans to add needed space to overflowing schools.

    Joe Nance, a fiscal consultant said he believed the board would be able to proceed with a $10 million project, and likely could get additional funding.

    He said the board’s bonding (or borrowing) potential is $5.8 million. Added to the $4 million set aside for building projects, the district is in a good position to proceed on a project.

  • Conquering the Canyon

     

     

     

     

     

     

    “Let’s get going!”

    After waiting more than three years for her chance to hike the Grand Canyon, 22-year-old Sarah Service wanted to get moving. Now.

  • Dispute may force Ghent to name board

    GHENT, Ky. – The Ghent City Commission met in special session Thursday, Oct. 9,  to decide on a variance request by Gary and Cheryl Nohner.

    By the end of the meeting, they discovered they had no jurisdiction in the matter.

    An attorney for a property owners Wayne and Diane Young cited in the Kentucky Revised Statutes that as a legislative body, the commission can only enact zoning and land-use ordinances.

  • Cause of death unknown for 26-year-old Carrollton man

    (Editor's note: The story published in the Oct. 15 issue of The News-Democrat incorrectly indicated that Carroll County Coroner David Wilhoite and KSP Trooper Ryan Gosser said they suspect Tommy Jones Jr.'s death was drug-related. In fact, authorities are unsure of any cause of death. The tests ordered are required, Wilhoite said, when a young person with no prior history of medical history dies suddenly. We regret the error and will run a correction in the Oct. 22 issue.)

  • Board told CCMS move to Cartmell could cost $10M

    By SANDIE BANKS

    N-D Correspondent

    A proposal to renovate Richard B. Cartmell Elementary School into a middle school for grades six through eight would cost more than $10 million, according to a consultant for the Carroll County Board of Education.

    The idea was one of the several proposed by a steering committee formed to determine the best way to accommodate a growing student population in the district, said Superintendent Lisa James.

  • Fiscal Court backs KU bond requests

    By SHARON GRAVES

    The News-Democrat

    Carroll County Fiscal Court on Tuesday, Sept. 23, approved several ordinances to help Kentucky Utilities secure funding for upcoming projects.

    Spencer Harper, an attorney for KU, explained to the court the various ordinances KU was asking for.

  • Bluegrass voters likely to see ‘red’ on Election Day

    By BRENT SCHANDING

    Landmark News Service

    The war in Iraq will take a back seat to the economy, while promises of “political change” will ultimately drive Kentucky voters this November. That’s the word from a sampling of elected leaders and political science professors across the state, who expect the outcomes of this year’s 2008 general election to be revealing – if not surprising – in Kentucky.

    Pollsters and political analysts predict the state will again be “red” this November.